Tag Archives: classics

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 10: 468-519 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week ten of our Read More Books challenge? 

 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

 

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

 

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR  WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN   WEEK EIGHT   WEEK NINE

 

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

468. A Room of One’s Own — by Virginia Woolf
469. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy — by John le Carré
470. Berlin Alexanderplatz — by Alfred Döblin
471. Cold Sassy Tree — by Olive Ann Burns
472. Look Homeward, Angel — by Thomas Wolfe
473. The Martian Chronicles — by Ray Bradbury
474. Skinny Legs and All — by Tom Robbins
475. Oliver Twist — by Charles Dickens
476.It — by Stephen King
477.A High Wind in Jamaica — by Richard Hughes
478. Cities of Salt  — by Abdelrahman Munif
479. You Shall Know Our Velocity — by Dave Eggers
480. Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein — by Marguerite Duras
481. The Death of Artemio Cruz — by Carlos Fuentes
482. The Power and the Glory — by Graham Greene
483. War and Remembrance — by Herman Wouk
484. Baudolino — by Umberto Eco
485. Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant — by Anne Tyler
486. The age of wire and string — by Ben Marcus
487. The Sorrows of Young Werther — by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
488. Where the Wild Things Are — by Maurice Sendak
489. Night Watch — by Terry Pratchett
490. Tropismes — by Nathalie Sarraute
491. Tlooth — by Harry Mathews
492. The Godfather — by Mario Puzo
493. Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me — by Richard Fariña
494. Pricksongs & descants — by Robert Coover
495. Waiting for the Mahatma — by R. K. Narayan
496. The Journal of Jules Renard — by Jules Renard
497. Notes from a small island — by Bill Bryson
498. Centennial — by James A. Michener
499. the man in the high castle — by Philip K. Dick
500. The Last Chronicle of Barset — by Anthony Trollope
501. Night — by Elie Wiesel
502. The Pickwick Papers — by Charles Dickens
503. Écrits — by Jacques Lacan
504. Silent Spring — by Rachel Carson
505. Jayber Crow — by Wendell Berry
506. Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont — by Elizabeth Taylor
507. The road from Coorain — by Jill Ker Conway
508. The Theater and Its Double — by Antonin Artaud
509. The Three Musketeers — by Alexandre Dumas
510. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas — by Gertrude Stein
511. Little, Big — by John Crowley
512. Manhattan Transfer — by John Dos Passos
513. A Brief History of Time — by Stephen Hawking
514. Candide — by Voltaire
515. The Sheltering Sky — by Paul Bowles
516. Popol Vuh — by Anonymous
517. Time and Again — by Jack Finney
518. Moravagine — by Blaise Cendrars
519. The Left Hand of Darkness — by Ursula K. Le Guin
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:

 

  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

 

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

 

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

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‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 9: 416-467 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week nine of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR  WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN   WEEK EIGHT

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

416. Petersburg — by Andrei Bely
417. City of Glass — by Paul Auster
418. Watchmen — by Alan Moore
419. The Satanic Verses — by Salman Rushdie
420. Libra — by Don DeLillo
421. Friday, or, The Other Island — by Michel Tournier
422. The Shadow of the Wind — by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
423. Parade’s End — by Ford Madox Ford
424. The Pursuit of Love — by Nancy Mitford
425. Always Coming Home — by Ursula K. Le Guin
426. The Princesse de Cleves — by Madame de La Fayette
427. Naked Lunch — by William S. Burroughs
428. Black Beauty — by Anna Sewell
429. The Savage Detectives — by Roberto Bolaño
430. London Fields — by Martin Amis
431. Infinite Jest — by David Foster Wallace
432. Artemis Fowl — by Eoin Colfer
433. Les Vrilles de La Vigne — by Colette
434. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time — by Mark Haddon
435. Zuleika Dobson — by Max Beerbohm
436. Testament of Youth — by Vera Brittain
437. Capital of Pain — by Paul Eluard
438. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn — by Betty Smith
439. Half of a Yellow Sun — by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
440. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories — by Flannery O’Connor
441. Martin Eden — by Jack London
442. Red Harvest — by Dashiell Hammett
443. Noughts & Crosses — by Malorie Blackman
444. The Leopard — by Giuseppe Di Lampedusa
445. The Alexandria Quartet — by Lawrence Durrell
446. The Ballad of the Salt Sea — by Hugo Pratt
447. What We Talk About When We Talk About Love — by Raymond Carver
448. Haroun and the Sea of Stories — by Salman Rushdie
449. Writing Degree Zero — by Roland Barthes
450. Cane — by Jean Toomer
451. The Lovely Bones — by Alice Sebold
452. Tales of the City — by Armistead Maupin
453. The Joy Luck Club — by Amy Tan
454. Mort — by Terry Pratchett
455. The Opposing Shore — by Julien Gracq
456. The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences — by Michel Foucault
457. Riddley Walker — by Russell Hoban
458. Of Human Bondage — by W. Somerset Maugham
459. Go in beauty — by William Eastlake
460. A Separate Peace — by John Knowles
461. The Quiet American — by Graham Greene
462. Dracula — by Bram Stoker
463. The Franchiser — by Stanley Elkin
464. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance — by Robert M. Pirsig
465. Enormous Changes at the Last Minute — by Grace Paley
466. Guards! Guards! — by Terry Pratchett
467. Ellen Foster — by Kaye Gibbons
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 8: 364-415 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week eight of our Read More Books challenge? 

 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

 

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

 

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR   WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN

 

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

364. Father and Sons — by Ivan Turgenev
365. A Wild Sheep Chase — by Haruki Murakami
366. Point Counter Point — by Aldous Huxley
367. Babbitt — by Sinclair Lewis
368. The Souls of Black Folk — by W. E. B. Du Bois
369. The Thirty-Nine Steps — by John Buchan
370. The Jungle — by Upton Sinclair
371. Under Satan’s Sun — by Georges Bernanos
372. The Voyeur — by Alain Robbe-Grillet
373. The Secret Agent — by Joseph Conrad
374. All Quiet on the Western Front — by Erich Maria Remarque
375. Double or Nothing — by Rayond Federman
376.  The Bonfire of the Vanities — by Tom Wolfe
377. The Phantom Tollbooth — by Norton Juster
378. Amers/Oiseaux/Poesie — by Saint-John Perse
379. The House of the Spirits — by Isabel Allende
380. Paradise Lost — by John Milton
381. The Joke — by Milan Kundera
382. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — by L. Frank Baum
383. At Swim-Two-Birds — by Flann O’Brien
384. Contempt — by Alberto Moravia
385. Dealing with Dragons — by Patricia C. Wrede
386. Blood Meridian — by Cormac McCarthy
387. The Home and the World — by Rabindranath Tagore
388. 2001: A Space Odyssey — by Arthur C. Clarke
389. American Pastoral — by Philip Roth
390. The Cannibal — by John Hawkes
391.Matilda — by Roald Dahl
392.The Thornbirds — Colleen McCullough
 393. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd — Agatha Christie
394.Good Night, Mr. Tom — Michelle Magorian
395. Nadja — André Breton
396.King Lear — William Shakespeare
 397. The Magnificent Ambersons — Booth Tarkington
398.Othello — William Shakespeare
399. Aurélien — Louis Aragon 
400.Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World Haruki Murakami
401.The Color of Water — James McBride
402.Soulier De Satin — Paul Claudel
403. Leaves of Grass — Walt Whitman
404. The Sonnets — William Shakespeare
405.American Psycho — Bret Easton Ellis
406. The Bean Trees — Barbara Kingsolver
407. Nightwood —by Djuna Barnes
408. Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction — by J. D. Salinger
409. High Fidelity — Nick Hornby
410. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas — Hunter S. Thompson
411. Kane and Abel — Jeffrey Archer
412. Franny and Zooey — J. D. Salinger
413. The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui —by Bertolt Brecht
414. Sense and Sensibility — Jane Austen
415.The Faraway Tree Stories — Enid Blyton
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  :)

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 7: 312-363 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week seven of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR   WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

312. Confessions — by Saint Augustine
313. The Golden Bowl — by Henry James
314. Belle Du Seigneur — by Albert Cohen
315. A Town Like Alice — by Nevil Shute
316. Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch — by Neil Gaiman
317. Three Men in a Boat — by Jerome K. Jerome
318. Leviathan — by Thomas Hobbes
319. The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists — by Robert Tressell
320. Bastard Out of Carolina — by Dorothy Allison
321. Hamlet — by William Shakespeare
322. Sister Carrie — by Theodore Dreiser
323. Death Comes for the Archbishop — by Willa Cather
324. The Sea, the Sea — by Iris Murdoch
325. The French Lieutenant’s Woman — by John Fowles
326. The Pillars of The Earth — by Ken Follett
327. Dhalgren — by Samuel R. Delany
328. Swallows and Amazons — by Arthur Ransome
329. History of the Peloponnesian War — by Thucydides
330. The Picture of Dorian Gray — by Oscar Wilde
331. A handful of dust — by Evelyn Waugh
332. The Diary of a Nobody — by George Grossmith
333. The Stain — by Rikki Ducornet
334. Snow Country — by Yasunari Kawabata
335. The Bone People — by Keri Hulme
336. The God of Small Things — by Arundhati Roy
337. Zazie dans le Métro — by Raymond Queneau
338. Lord Jim — by Joseph Conrad
339. Neuromancer — by William Gibson
340. Treasure Island — by Robert Louis Stevenson
341. Ragtime — by E. L. Doctorow
342. The Kite Runner — by Khaled Hosseini
343. Confusion: The Private Papers of Privy Councillor R. von D. — by Stefan Zweig
344. A Wizard of Earthsea — by Ursula K. Le Guin
345. The Warden — by Anthony Trollope
346. The Riddle of the Sands — by Erskine Childers
347. Gormenghast — by Mervyn Peake
348. The Secret History — by Donna Tartt
349. Lookout Cartridge — by Joseph McElroy
350. The Shell Seekers — by Rosamunde Pilcher
351. The BFG — by Roald Dahl
352. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich — by Alexander Solzhenitsyn
353. The Heart of the Matter — by Graham Greene
354. Call it Sleep — by Henry Roth
355. Bonjour Tristesse — by Françoise Sagan
356. Sophie’s World — by Jostein Gaarder
357. The Da Vinci Code — by Dan Brown
358. The Sot-Weed Factor — by John Barth
359. Le Silence de La Mer — by Vercors
360. Bridget Jones’s Diary — by Helen Fielding
361. Deliverance — by James Dickey
362. Genoa — by Paul Metcalf
363. Snow Falling on Cedars — by David Guterson
 
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

There will not be a book list next week because on November 28 we get to read the next installment of Sue Harrison’s writers workshop. This gives us an extra week for reading until week 8’s book reading challenge on December 5.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

 

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 6: 260-311 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week six of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE  WEEK FOUR  WEEK FIVE   

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

260. Les Misérables — by Victor Hugo
261. Tristes Tropiques — by Claude Lévi-Strauss
262. Dream of the Red Chamber — by Tsao Hsueh-Chin
263. Slouching Towards Bethlehem — by Joan Didion
264. Old Goriot — by Honoré de Balzac
265. Oscar and Lucinda — by Peter Carey
266. The Interrogation — by J. M. G. Le Clezio
267.  Appointment in Samarra — by John O’Hara
268. A House for Mr. Biswas — by V. S. Naipaul
269. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer — by Patrick Suskind
270. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets — by J. K. Rowling
271. The Secret Garden — by Frances Hodgson Burnett
272. Asterix the Gaul — by René Goscinny
273. The Wasp Factory — by Iain Banks
274. The Fountainhead — by Ayn Rand
275. Four Plays — by Eugene Ionesco
276. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban — by J. K. Rowling
277. Germinal — by Émile Zola
278. The Moonstone — by Wilkie Collins
279. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha — by Roddy Doyle
280. Sixty Stories — by Donald Barthelme
281. Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality — by Sigmund Freud
282. Waiting for the Barbarians — by J. M. Coetzee
283. Angela’s Ashes — by Frank McCourt
284. The Abyss — by Marguerite Yourcenar
285. The Way We Live Now — by Anthony Trollope
286. The Rifles — by William Vollmann
287. Democracy in America; and Two essays on America — by Alexis de Tocqueville
288. Cranford — by Elizabeth Gaskell
289. A Christmas Carol — by Charles Dickens
290. Fahrenheit 451 — by Ray Bradbury
291. The Rocognitions — by William Gaddis
292. On the Origins of Species — by Charles Darwin
293. Sula — by Toni Morrison
294. Daniel Deronda — by George Eliot
295. The Tartar Steppe — by Dino Buzzati
296. Young Lonigan — by James T. Farrell
297. On the Social Contract — by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
298. Sea of Poppies — by Amitav Ghosh
299. Portnoy’s Complaint — by Philip Roth
300. Shadow of the Torturer — by Gene Wolfe
301. Das Kapital — by Karl Marx
302. Cider with Rosie — by Laurie Lee
303. The Prince — by Niccolò Machiavelli
304. The Horseman on the Roof — by Jean Giono
305. The Executioner’s Song — by Norman Mailer
306. Atlas Shrugged — by Ayn Rand
307. Suite Française — by Irene Nemirovsky
308. Mountains Beyond Mountains — by Tracy Kidder
309. Cold Comfort Farm — by Stella Gibbons
310. The Story of Tracy Beaker — by Jacqueline Wilson
311. Angle of Repose — by Wallace Stegner
 
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

‘Read More Books’ challenge: week 5: 208-259 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week five of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR   

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

208. Dead Souls — by Nikolai Gogol
209. Rabbit, Run — by John Updike
210. The Complete Stories — by Flannery O’Connor
211. The Making of Americans — by Gertrude Stein
212. Crash — by J. G. Ballard
213. The Glass Bead Game — by Hermann Hesse
214. Darkness at Noon — by Arthur Koestler
215. The Plague — by Albert Camus
216. The Soft Machine — by William S. Burroughs
217. Les Liaisons Dangereuses — by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos
218. The Wanderer — by Alain-Fournier
219. Winesburg, Ohio — by Sherwood Anderson
220. Froth on the Daydream — by Boris Vian
221. Trainspotting — by Irvine Welsh
222. The Moviegoer — by Walker Percy
223. The Canterbury Tales — by Geoffrey Chaucer
224. Main Street — by Sinclair Lewis
225. Take It or Leave It — by Raymond Federman
226. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China — by Jung Chang
227. Nightmare Abbey — by Thomas Love Peacock
228. My Name is Red — by Orhan Pamuk
229. The Second Sex — by Simone de Beauvoir
230. The Awakening — by Kate Chopin
231. From Here to Eternity — by James Jones
232. The Black Sheep — by Honoré de Balzac
233. The Man Without Qualities — by Robert Musil
234. The Way of All Flesh — by Samuel Butler
235. The Wapshot Chronicle — by John Cheever
236. Going Native — by Stephen Wright
237. The Charterhouse of Parma — by Stendhal
238. The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum — by Heinrich Böll
239. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare — by William Shakespeare
240. The Cairo Trilogy: Palace Walk, Palace of Desire, Sugar Street — by Naguib Mahfouz
241. Stranger in a Strange Land — by Robert A. Heinlein
242. In Cold Blood — by Truman Capote
243. The Code of the Woosters — by P. G. Wodehouse
244. The Red and the Black — by Stendhal
245. Sybil, of Two Nations — by Benjamin Disraeli
246. In the Heart of the Heart of the Country & Other Stories — by William H. Gass
247. Paroles — by Jacques Prévert
248. The Maltese Falcon — by Dashiell Hammett
249. Alcools — by Guillaume Apollinaire
250. Wise Blood — by Flannery O’Connor
251. The Magus — by John Fowles
252. The Wonderful Adventures of Nils — by Selma Lagerlöf
253. The Blue Lotus – by Hergé
254. The Naked and the Dead — by Norman Mailer
255. Orlando: A Biography — by Virginia Woolf
256. Hunger — by Knut Hamsun
257. The Time Traveler’s Wife — by Audrey Niffenegger
258. A Tale of Two Cities — by Charles Dickens
259. A Wrinkle in Time — by Madeleine L’Engle
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

What are your reading and book buying habits?

How’s your reading coming along?

I have been slowly making my way through the large and varied collection of books I have accumulated over the years. I got into the habit of obtaining a book and not taking the time to read it yet, so now I have a great amount of catching up to do. To make matters ‘worse’ – or rather, more complicated – I keep gaining books. I am either buying them or winning them, but either way my bookcase is getting stuffed with new books. And I love it! (You can see most of my books listed on Library Thing – link in right sidebar, if you want to take a peek.)

Want to know what my newest classic addition is?

War and Peace.

Yes, you read that right. I bought a copy of the newly revised War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. You may ask, why did you do that, Lynn? Wellll .. I’m not really sure except that it is on the BBC’s 2009 list of 100 books that people should read – and I hadn’t read it yet. War and Peace is number 24 on that list, as you will see in my January 13’10 post: https://lynnadavidson.wordpress.com/2010/01/13/have-you-read-these-100-books/ Also, I had heard people talk about this book that is long to read, but not much about it otherwise. Curiosity got the best of me, I want to be able to say I read it, so now I have eliminated one excuse. 🙂

Have you read War and Peace? 

If you check the above link you will find that number 18 is Catcher in the Rye by J D Salinger. Such a little book which I bought last year and have yet to read. I’ve heard mixed reviews of that one so I’m interested in finding out if it makes any sense to me.

So much to devour, so little time free to do it! But I am trying to read, read, read, while not totally forgetting the writing. Not that I’ve been doing any writing, what with all the changes happening in our lives right now, but I haven’t forgotten about it. 😉

So, what are your reading habits? And what are your book buying habits? 

Do you buy and read one book at a time? Or do you buy the book when it comes out and then file it away to read at a later date? Or do you have another method? I’m very interested in hearing from you on this.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

This post has been scheduled, so I look forward to early next week, if not before, when I can enjoy your comments and reply to them.