Tag Archives: books to read

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 8: 364-415 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week eight of our Read More Books challenge? 

 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

 

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

 

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR   WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN

 

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

364. Father and Sons — by Ivan Turgenev
365. A Wild Sheep Chase — by Haruki Murakami
366. Point Counter Point — by Aldous Huxley
367. Babbitt — by Sinclair Lewis
368. The Souls of Black Folk — by W. E. B. Du Bois
369. The Thirty-Nine Steps — by John Buchan
370. The Jungle — by Upton Sinclair
371. Under Satan’s Sun — by Georges Bernanos
372. The Voyeur — by Alain Robbe-Grillet
373. The Secret Agent — by Joseph Conrad
374. All Quiet on the Western Front — by Erich Maria Remarque
375. Double or Nothing — by Rayond Federman
376.  The Bonfire of the Vanities — by Tom Wolfe
377. The Phantom Tollbooth — by Norton Juster
378. Amers/Oiseaux/Poesie — by Saint-John Perse
379. The House of the Spirits — by Isabel Allende
380. Paradise Lost — by John Milton
381. The Joke — by Milan Kundera
382. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — by L. Frank Baum
383. At Swim-Two-Birds — by Flann O’Brien
384. Contempt — by Alberto Moravia
385. Dealing with Dragons — by Patricia C. Wrede
386. Blood Meridian — by Cormac McCarthy
387. The Home and the World — by Rabindranath Tagore
388. 2001: A Space Odyssey — by Arthur C. Clarke
389. American Pastoral — by Philip Roth
390. The Cannibal — by John Hawkes
391.Matilda — by Roald Dahl
392.The Thornbirds — Colleen McCullough
 393. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd — Agatha Christie
394.Good Night, Mr. Tom — Michelle Magorian
395. Nadja — André Breton
396.King Lear — William Shakespeare
 397. The Magnificent Ambersons — Booth Tarkington
398.Othello — William Shakespeare
399. Aurélien — Louis Aragon 
400.Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World Haruki Murakami
401.The Color of Water — James McBride
402.Soulier De Satin — Paul Claudel
403. Leaves of Grass — Walt Whitman
404. The Sonnets — William Shakespeare
405.American Psycho — Bret Easton Ellis
406. The Bean Trees — Barbara Kingsolver
407. Nightwood —by Djuna Barnes
408. Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction — by J. D. Salinger
409. High Fidelity — Nick Hornby
410. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas — Hunter S. Thompson
411. Kane and Abel — Jeffrey Archer
412. Franny and Zooey — J. D. Salinger
413. The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui —by Bertolt Brecht
414. Sense and Sensibility — Jane Austen
415.The Faraway Tree Stories — Enid Blyton
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  :)

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 6: 260-311 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week six of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE  WEEK FOUR  WEEK FIVE   

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

260. Les Misérables — by Victor Hugo
261. Tristes Tropiques — by Claude Lévi-Strauss
262. Dream of the Red Chamber — by Tsao Hsueh-Chin
263. Slouching Towards Bethlehem — by Joan Didion
264. Old Goriot — by Honoré de Balzac
265. Oscar and Lucinda — by Peter Carey
266. The Interrogation — by J. M. G. Le Clezio
267.  Appointment in Samarra — by John O’Hara
268. A House for Mr. Biswas — by V. S. Naipaul
269. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer — by Patrick Suskind
270. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets — by J. K. Rowling
271. The Secret Garden — by Frances Hodgson Burnett
272. Asterix the Gaul — by René Goscinny
273. The Wasp Factory — by Iain Banks
274. The Fountainhead — by Ayn Rand
275. Four Plays — by Eugene Ionesco
276. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban — by J. K. Rowling
277. Germinal — by Émile Zola
278. The Moonstone — by Wilkie Collins
279. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha — by Roddy Doyle
280. Sixty Stories — by Donald Barthelme
281. Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality — by Sigmund Freud
282. Waiting for the Barbarians — by J. M. Coetzee
283. Angela’s Ashes — by Frank McCourt
284. The Abyss — by Marguerite Yourcenar
285. The Way We Live Now — by Anthony Trollope
286. The Rifles — by William Vollmann
287. Democracy in America; and Two essays on America — by Alexis de Tocqueville
288. Cranford — by Elizabeth Gaskell
289. A Christmas Carol — by Charles Dickens
290. Fahrenheit 451 — by Ray Bradbury
291. The Rocognitions — by William Gaddis
292. On the Origins of Species — by Charles Darwin
293. Sula — by Toni Morrison
294. Daniel Deronda — by George Eliot
295. The Tartar Steppe — by Dino Buzzati
296. Young Lonigan — by James T. Farrell
297. On the Social Contract — by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
298. Sea of Poppies — by Amitav Ghosh
299. Portnoy’s Complaint — by Philip Roth
300. Shadow of the Torturer — by Gene Wolfe
301. Das Kapital — by Karl Marx
302. Cider with Rosie — by Laurie Lee
303. The Prince — by Niccolò Machiavelli
304. The Horseman on the Roof — by Jean Giono
305. The Executioner’s Song — by Norman Mailer
306. Atlas Shrugged — by Ayn Rand
307. Suite Française — by Irene Nemirovsky
308. Mountains Beyond Mountains — by Tracy Kidder
309. Cold Comfort Farm — by Stella Gibbons
310. The Story of Tracy Beaker — by Jacqueline Wilson
311. Angle of Repose — by Wallace Stegner
 
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

‘Read More Books’ challenge: week 5: 208-259 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week five of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR   

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

208. Dead Souls — by Nikolai Gogol
209. Rabbit, Run — by John Updike
210. The Complete Stories — by Flannery O’Connor
211. The Making of Americans — by Gertrude Stein
212. Crash — by J. G. Ballard
213. The Glass Bead Game — by Hermann Hesse
214. Darkness at Noon — by Arthur Koestler
215. The Plague — by Albert Camus
216. The Soft Machine — by William S. Burroughs
217. Les Liaisons Dangereuses — by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos
218. The Wanderer — by Alain-Fournier
219. Winesburg, Ohio — by Sherwood Anderson
220. Froth on the Daydream — by Boris Vian
221. Trainspotting — by Irvine Welsh
222. The Moviegoer — by Walker Percy
223. The Canterbury Tales — by Geoffrey Chaucer
224. Main Street — by Sinclair Lewis
225. Take It or Leave It — by Raymond Federman
226. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China — by Jung Chang
227. Nightmare Abbey — by Thomas Love Peacock
228. My Name is Red — by Orhan Pamuk
229. The Second Sex — by Simone de Beauvoir
230. The Awakening — by Kate Chopin
231. From Here to Eternity — by James Jones
232. The Black Sheep — by Honoré de Balzac
233. The Man Without Qualities — by Robert Musil
234. The Way of All Flesh — by Samuel Butler
235. The Wapshot Chronicle — by John Cheever
236. Going Native — by Stephen Wright
237. The Charterhouse of Parma — by Stendhal
238. The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum — by Heinrich Böll
239. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare — by William Shakespeare
240. The Cairo Trilogy: Palace Walk, Palace of Desire, Sugar Street — by Naguib Mahfouz
241. Stranger in a Strange Land — by Robert A. Heinlein
242. In Cold Blood — by Truman Capote
243. The Code of the Woosters — by P. G. Wodehouse
244. The Red and the Black — by Stendhal
245. Sybil, of Two Nations — by Benjamin Disraeli
246. In the Heart of the Heart of the Country & Other Stories — by William H. Gass
247. Paroles — by Jacques Prévert
248. The Maltese Falcon — by Dashiell Hammett
249. Alcools — by Guillaume Apollinaire
250. Wise Blood — by Flannery O’Connor
251. The Magus — by John Fowles
252. The Wonderful Adventures of Nils — by Selma Lagerlöf
253. The Blue Lotus – by Hergé
254. The Naked and the Dead — by Norman Mailer
255. Orlando: A Biography — by Virginia Woolf
256. Hunger — by Knut Hamsun
257. The Time Traveler’s Wife — by Audrey Niffenegger
258. A Tale of Two Cities — by Charles Dickens
259. A Wrinkle in Time — by Madeleine L’Engle
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 3: 104-155 of the list of 623 best books ever!

Are you ready for week three of our Read More Books challenge?

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s not too late to join in.

Check WEEK ONE and WEEK TWO of the list.

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

NOTE: Next Thursday, Part 10 of Sue Harrison’s writers workshop will be the highlight. Come back October 31 for part four of the reading challenge. This gives you more time to read until the next list of books. 🙂

Here is week three’s list:

104. The Heart is A Lonely Hunter — by Carson McCullers
105. Vanity Fair — by William Makepeace Thackeray
106. Commedia — by Dante Alighieri
107. The Count of Monte Cristo — by Alexandre Dumas
108. An American Tragedy — by Theodore Dreiser
109. White Noise — by Don DeLillo
110. The World According to Garp — by John Irving
111. Atonement — by Ian McEwan
112. Nostromo — by Joseph Conrad
113. The House of Mirth — by Edith Wharton
114. The Brothers Karamazov — by Fyodor Dostoevsky
115. The Good Soldier — by Ford Madox Ford
116. The Name of the Rose — by Umberto Eco
117. The Shipping News — by Annie Proulx
118. The Woman in White — by Wilkie Collins
119. Herzog — by Saul Bellow
120. The Counterfeiters — by Andre Gide
121. My Antonia — by Willa Cather
122. Scoop — by Evelyn Waugh
123. A Room with a View — by E. M. Forster
124. Bible: King James Version
125. Wide Sargasso Sea — by Jean Rhys
126. Love in The Time of Cholera — by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
127. The Remains of the day — by Kazuo Ishiguro
128. The Big Sleep — by Raymond Chandler
129. I, Claudius — by Robert Graves
130. Tropic of Cancer — by Henry Miller
131. Tender is the Night — by F. Scott Fitzgerald
132. Journey to the End of the Night — by Louis-Ferdinand Celine
133. The War of the Worlds — by H. G. Wells
134. A Suitable Boy — by Vikram Seth
135. Possession — by A. S. Byatt
136. A Confederacy of Dunces — by John Kennedy Toole
137. The Bell Jar — by Sylvia Plath
138. Waiting for Godot — by Samuel Beckett
139. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao — by Junot Diaz
140. Being and Nothingness — by Jean-Paul Sartre
141. A Thousand Acres — by Jane Smiley
142. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay — by Michael Chabon
143. The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956: An Experiment in Literary Investigation — by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
144. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory — by Roald Dahl
145. Lady Chatterley’s Lover — by D. H. Lawrence
146. JR — by William Gaddis
147. The Histories — by Herodotus
148. Doctor Zhivago — by Boris Pasternak
149. Lucky Jim — by Kingsley Amis
150. Underworld — by Don DeLillo
151. If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler — by Italo Calvino
152. Life — by Georges Perec
153. The Master and Margarita — by Mikhail Bulgakov
154. The Good Earth — by Pearl S. Buck
155. Henderson the Rain King — by Saul Bellow
 
From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! 🙂

‘Read More Books’ Challenge: Week 2: 53-103 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week two of our Read More Books challenge?

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s not too late to join in.

Check WEEK ONE of the list if you missed it.

There were a few responses to week one’s challenge. How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

Here is week two’s list of 52 books:

53. A Prayer for Owen Meany — by John Irving
54. Emma — by Jane Austen
55. David Copperfield — by Charles Dickens
56. The Portrait of a Lady — by Henry James
57. The Trial — by Franz Kafka
58. Crime and Punishment — by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
59. A Clockwork Orange — by Anthony Burgess
60. The Age of Innocence — by Edith Wharton
61. Don Quixote — by Miguel de Cervantes
62. As I Lay Dying — by William Faulkner
63. His Dark Materials — by Philip Pullman
64. Brideshead Revisited — by Evelyn Waugh
65. The Golden Notebook — by Doris Lessing
66. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn — by Mark Twain
67. Things Fall Apart — by Chinua Achebe
68. Tom Jones — by Henry Fielding
69. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone — by J. K. Rowling
70. Song of Solomon — by Toni Morrison
71. Molloy; Malone Dies; The Unnamable — by Samuel Beckett
72. Finnegans Wake — by James Joyce
73. Absalom, Absalom! — by William Faulkner
74. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman — by Laurence Sterne
75. Charlotte’s Web — by E. B. White
76. The Ambassadors — by Henry James
77. Sons and Lovers — by D. H. Lawrence
78. A Farewell to Arms — by Ernest Hemingway
79. Women in Love — by D. H. Lawrence
80. Birdsong — by Sebastian Faulks
81. Gulliver’s Travels — by Jonathan Swift
82. Watership Down — by Richard Adams
83. Gravity’s Rainbow — by Thomas Pynchon
84. Frankenstein — by Mary Shelley
85. Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady — by Samuel Richardson
86. The Old Man and the Sea — by Ernest Hemingway
87. Dune — by Frank Herbert
88. The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe — by Daniel Defoe
89. Go Tell It on the Mountain — by James Baldwin
90. All the King’s Men — by Robert Penn Warren
91. The Magic Mountain — by Thomas Mann
92. The Call of the Wild — by Jack London
93. The Tin Drum — by Gunter Grass
94. The 42nd Parallel — by John Dos Passos
95. Under the Volcano — by Malcolm Lowry
96. Disgrace — by J. M. Coetzee
97. The Diary of a Young Girl — by Anne Frank
98. Bleak House — by Charles Dickens
99. Light in August — by William Faulkner
100. Scarlet Letter — by Nathaniel Hawthorne
101. Pale Fire — by Vladimir Nabokov
102. Captain Corelli’s Mandolin — by Louis de Bernieres
103. Howards End — by E. M. Forster
 
From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! 🙂

‘Read More Books’ Challenge: Week 1: 1-52 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for the challenge?

Thanks to Erik of This Kid Reviews Books, my challenge now has a name: Read More Books Challenge.

Please go to THIS SHORT POST first if you don’t know what I’m talking about.

MY OFFER

Because I know you love to read – or read and write – I have decided to give you the list I found, and I got permission to do so. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

The reason I thought you might enjoy the list in sections is so that you can see which ones you have already read – a few at a time – and then —

MY CHALLENGE

… you will have a week to buy or borrow the ones you want to read before my next installment of more of the list. I was going to divide it between six posts, but changed that to twelve posts because the shorter lists are easier to work with if you want to shop for a book each week. How’s that for a little incentive for those of us who can find time to read more often? Besides, it might be fun! 🙂 And who doesn’t appreciate an excuse to book shop?

Each Thursday I will post another portion of the list of “623 of the best books ever written” until we get to the end of twelve posts. NOTE: On the fourth Thursday of each month it will not be posted because we have Sue Harrison’s writers workshop that day – and I don’t want to mess with a good thing!

Here are the first 52 books of “623 of the best books ever written” as compiled and listed on a list of books website.

  1. The Great Gatsby — by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  2. The Grapes of Wrath — by John Steinbeck
  3. Nineteen Eighty-Four — by George Orwell
  4. Ulysses — by James Joyce
  5. Lolita — by Vladimir Nabokov
  6. Catch-22 — by Joseph Heller
  7. The Catcher in the Rye — by J. D. Salinger
  8. Beloved — by Toni Morrison
  9. The Sound and the Fury — by William Faulkner
  10. To Kill a Mockingbird — by Harper Lee
  11. The Lord of the Rings — by J. R. R. Tolkien
  12. One Hundred Years of Solitude — by Gabriel Garcia Márquez
  13. Brave New World — by Aldous Huxley
  14. To The Lighthouse — by Virginia Woolf
  15. Invisible Man — by Ralph Ellison
  16. Gone With The Wind — by Margaret Mitchell
  17. Jane Eyre — by Charlotte Brontë
  18. On The Road — by Jack Kerouac
  19. Pride and Prejudice — by Jane Austen
  20. Lord of the Flies — by William Golding
  21. Middle March — by George Eliot
  22. Anna Karenina — by Leo Tolstoy
  23. Animal Farm — by George Orwell
  24. A Passage to India — by E. M. Forster
  25. In Search of Lost Time — by Marcel Proust
  26. Wuthering Heights — by Emily Brontë
  27. The Chronicles of Narnia — by C. S. Lewis
  28. The Color Purple — by Alice Walker
  29. Midnight’s Children — by Salman Rushdie
  30. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man — by James Joyce
  31. Winnie-the-Pooh — by A. A. Milne
  32. Heart of Darkness — by Joseph Conrad
  33. Mrs Dalloway — by Virginia Woolf
  34. Slaughterhouse-Five — by Kurt Vonnegut
  35. War and Peace — by Leo Tolstoy
  36. Of Mice and Men — by John Steinbeck
  37. Moby-Dick — by Herman Melville
  38. Little Women — by Louisa Mae Alcott
  39. Native Son — by Richard Wright
  40. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy — by Douglas Adams
  41. Great Expectations — by Charles Dickens
  42. The Sun Also Rises — by Ernest Hemingway
  43. Rebecca — by Daphne du Maurier
  44. The Stranger — by Albert Camus
  45. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass — by Lewis Carroll
  46. For Whom the Bell Tolls — by Ernest Hemingway
  47. The Hobbit — by J. R. R. Tolkien
  48. Madame Bovary — by Gustave Flaubert
  49. The Wind in the Willows — by Kenneth Grahame
  50. The Handmaid’s Tale — by Margaret Atwood
  51. Tess of the D’Urbervilles — by Thomas Hardy
  52. Their Eyes Were Watching God — by Zora Neale Hurston

From the above list:

  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not taking the challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! 🙂

Are you up for a reading challenge?

Are you up for a challenge?

As you may know …

I   love   books.   I love to read books.   I love to collect books to read.

MY DISCOVERY

This week, when I did a search for the best books ever, I found a website with lists of books. Only lists of books!

Books you can’t live without.

Books that are best sellers.

Books that are the greatest of all time.

The list consists of a compilation of 13 lists of top 100 books, a list totalling 623 books! (It’s the odd number 623 because some titles were on more than one list so only mentioned once when the lists were condensed into one. Make sense?)

NOTE: Unfortunately, most of the 623 books are more for adults and only a few are for young readers.

I was disappointed and a little surprised to discover I have read only 21 books on that combined list! But, there are a few books I had started and didn’t finish (I have to dig those ones out and start over) and there are many more I want to read. 

I would be interested in knowing how you size up when it comes to what on the list you have read and if you plan to read others on there. Sooooo …. I decided to offer you a challenge!  Yes, a reading challenge!  Are you up for it?

Starting October 3, once a week a new part of the list will be here for you to see and let me know how you are doing. Until then I will be getting those posts of lists ready and scheduled. I also have set up the Milestone widget so you can see the notice and reminders of upcoming installments, and I will include links each week to past posts of the list in case you miss any.

I know this time of year is very busy for most of us, and I think we have to learn to de-stress. When you need a break for a little time to yourself what is better than curling up with a good book … even for fifteen minutes or half an hour?

Now that I think about it, I should take on this challenge myself! I have so many books on hand to read and some of them are on the list I will be sharing with you. Shall we do it?

Who is willing to join me in this reading challenge?

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! 🙂