Inspiring writing reminder

“I wonder how old we are when we stop thinking like kids?”  – This Kid Reviews Books  (Quote used with permission. Thanks, Erik!)

Book Review: The Very Fairy Princess Follows Her Heart – by Julie Andrews Edwards & Emma Walton Hamilton

 

 

 

 

 

Book: The Very Fairy Princess Follows Her Heart
Author(s): Julie Andrews Edwards & Emma Walton Hamilton
Illustrator: Christine Davenier
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Date: January 1, 2013
Genre: children’s picture book: 3 – 6 yrs; Preschool – 3
Pages: 32
Price: $16.99
My rating: a sweet story to help a child build confidence

The Very Fairy Princess Follows Her Heart, written by the mother-daughter team Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton, is book six of the The Very Fairy Princess series.

Gerry believes in her heart that she is a princess because she can feel the sparkle inside. Valentine’s Day is coming up and that day is a favourite for Gerry. She worked hard making sparkly valentines for everyone in her class, even for the boy who pulls her hair.

Her mommy gave her a folder like her daddy’s to keep all her special valentines safe, and on Valentine’s Day morning Gerry got all dressed up, grabbed the folder, and rushed out to catch the bus to school.

Gerry could hardly wait for when their teacher says it’s time for everyone to give out their valentines. She was so excited, so when it was time to pass out the valentines she eagerly opened her folder. Oh-oh! – she had one of her daddy’s folders filled with his work papers! She must have mixed them up. Her day quickly went from sparkly to un-sparkly. Although Gerry was very sad about the mistake, she came up with a special idea for each person in the class. This is another adorable story in the The Very Fairy Princess series by Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton. The story is told in a way that encourages the child reader to share from the heart, and is illustrated by Christine Davenier in bright and sweet images with lots of sparkle.

You can find The Very Fairy Princess Follows Her Heart by Julie Andrews Edwards and Emma Walton Hamilton on my BUY THE BOOK page. I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Goodreads, and on Chapters.Indigo if available there.

 

Your comments for authors and illustrators are very much appreciated. Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂
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Book Review: Onward and Upward in the Garden – by Katharine S. White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book: Onward and Upward in the Garden
Author: Katharine S. White; edited by E. B. White
Publisher: various
Date 1977; reprint editions available
Genre: gardening
Pages: 392
Price: $17.95 and up
My rating: impressive collection of very interesting essays 

 

Katharine S. White was an editor at the New Yorker for thirty-four years. Near the end of that job she began writing garden pieces in a column called Onward and Upward in the Garden, and over the next twelve years her series grew to fourteen pieces in print. Katharine had become a well-respected garden writer who researched thoroughly for each piece.

Katharine was convinced by a writer friend that her garden essays were worthy of being published as a book, but it wasn’t until after Katharine’s death that it happened. Her husband, E. B.White – author of Charlotte’s Web, Stuart Little, and other books – collected, edited, and, in 1977, published his wife’s work into the book Onward and Upward in the Garden, named after the column that started it all.

This is not my usual reading; however, I found it very interesting. It’s almost a memoir, although the author revealed very little about her personal life in her writing. Her focus was centered on varying aspects of gardening, and she wrote with humour in all the right places. The historical and detailed information she shared is impressive.

Mrs. White wrote a critical, but not harsh, review of the seed catalogues current at the time. As a passionate gardener, she expressed her joy of some specimens, her disgust of a few others, and her ideas of how to improve both the catalogues of seeds and plants and the gardens into which they would be planted.

Found at the beginning of the book is a very fitting introduction written by E. B. White. Following the fourteen chapters listed below is an afterword by Jamaica Kincaid – novelist, essayist, gardener, and gardening writer.

Chapters of Onward and Upward in the Garden:

  1. A Romp in the Catalogues
  2. Floricordially Yours
  3. Before the Frost
  4. The Changing Rose, the Enduring Cabbage
  5. War in the Borders, Peace in the Shrubbery
  6. Green Thoughts in a Green Shade
  7. For the Recreation & Delight of the Inhabitants
  8. An Idea Which We Have Called Nature
  9. The Million-Dollar Book
  10. The Flower Arrangers
  11. More about the Arrangers
  12. Winter Reading, Winter Dreams
  13. Winterthur and Winter Book Fare
  14. Knots and Arbours – and Books

Following the Afterword is listed a section called Seedsmen and Nurserymen, which precedes the section Books in Print.

For anyone who loves gardening and a quiet informative read, Onward and Upward in the Garden by Katharine White is a book to enjoy. It is full of information about flowers, flower selection, seed catalogues and nurseries, flower shows, historic facts about people and plants, and the feeling of listening to a friend.

You can find Onward and Upward in the Garden by Katharine S. White on my BUY THE BOOK page. I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Goodreads, and on Chapters.Indigo if available there.

Your comments are very much appreciated.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Video: Bride sings at her own wedding

It seems that each year many of the weddings that take place are plentiful in June, although not in my family. Maybe one of my daughters will choose that month, but not yet. The weddings in my family (my husband’s parents, my parents, and our siblings included) have been in May, July, August, October, and we have one coming up in September this year.

This video is of a bride singing with her dad at her wedding. I hope you enjoy it.

Did you do something bold like that at your wedding, or is there another wedding that stands apart in your memory for some special reason?

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

 

 

 

Book Review: Buster the Little Garbage Truck – by Marcia Berneger

 

 

 




Book: Buster the Little Garbage Truck
Author: Marcia Berneger
Illustrator: Kevin Zimmer
Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press
Date: April 1, 2015
Genre: Picture book; age 3-6; Preschool - 1
Pages: 32
Price: $14.99
My rating: A good story to encourage children to be 
confident and brave

 

Buster the Little Garbage Truck, written by Marcia Berneger, is a story young children will relate to and understand.

Buster admired his father and all the other trucks who were big and capable. He wanted so much to be just like his father. He even practiced doing big truck things like lifting and beeping when he played with his best friend, Kitty, a small kitten.

One day his father took Buster along when he went to work. Buster was excited until all his dad’s friends came over and welcomed him with their loud honks and beeps. He was so afraid of the noise that he skidded to his daddy’s side and wouldn’t leave him all day. His dad didn’t know what to do about him.

At home again Buster tried to get unafraid, but he didn’t know how to not be scared by loud noises. How could he ever be like his dad and work with other big trucks if he is afraid?

One day Kitty was in danger. Buster tried to beep a warning, but he couldn’t be heard. He had to save his friend!

Buster the Little Garbage Truck is sweetly illustrated by Kevin Zimmer. Children will love the bright friendly tone of the pictures and will also enjoy finding out how Buster’s courage comes out. This is a very well told story to encourage little children that they, too, can overcome their fears.

You can find Buster the Little Garbage Truck by Marcia Berenger on my BUY THE BOOK page. I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Goodreads, and on Chapters.Indigo if available there.

Please encourage an author and illustrator by leaving a comment.

Thank you for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Book Review: Sarah – by Jean Edwards Stacey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book: Sarah
Author: Jean Edwards Stacey
Illustrator: Necie
Publisher: DRC Publishing
Date: October 15, 2016
Genre: Children's picture book; music
Pages: 40
Price: $12.95
My rating: a story about generations of family

 

Sarah by Jean Edwards Stacey is a “traditional song made famous by Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers, featuring Ray Johnson.” Ray inspired this book to be written as it was a song his father used to sing.

The story goes that a young couple married and had a son a few years later. That son grew up, married, and he and his wife had a little girl. They named their daughter Sarah, after her grandmother.

Sarah liked to ask her grandmother about how her grandparents met. The story goes on, humorously, about her grandfather trying to date her grandmother, about her great-grandmother trying to chase him off, and how funny it all was years later.

The illustrations are bright and sunny. In the back of the book is the sheet music with the words of the song.

You can find Sarah by Jean Edwards Stacey on my BUY THE BOOK page. I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Goodreads, and on Chapters.Indigo if available there.

Your comments here for the author and illustrator are very much appreciated.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

5 Bad Writing Habits You Can Break Today (infographic)

Thanks to GrammarCheck.net, here is an infographic that will help you improve your writing. As you read this through, it’s quite possible you can find habits you’ve formed in your writing, habits that can be eliminated with practice.

 

The chart is small here, but you can easily enlarge it. Left click on it to open another page similar to this one. Left click on the chart there, which should give you the infographic again but with a plus sign on it so you can enlarge the image. Left click to open it to a large readable size. Did you get it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What bad writing habit(s) are you now aware you have? I seem to have several … Oops! See what I did? I should have said I have several.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Book Review: Bat Count: a Citizen Science Story – by Anna Forrester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book: Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story
Author: Anna Forrester
Illustrator: Susan Detwiler
Publisher: Arbordale Publishing
Date: February 10, 2017
Genre: science picture book; age 4-8; gr K-3
Pages: 32
Price: $14.95 or $23.98 (hardcover)
My rating: An interesting, informative story with fabulous illustrations

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story, written by Anna Forrester, is a wonderfully told story about bats that a family discovers in the barn and the risk to the survival of bats.

First of all, this hardcover book is illustrated in bold colours by Susan Detwiler and the font used is large and sharp – black on light pages, white on dark pages. I like that the family is not Caucasian and that the images are realistic and believable.

The story is told in the voice and from the perspective of the young daughter of the family. Jojo, her mom, dad, and three-year-old twin brothers, live in a large country house that has a big barn.

Before the twins were born, Jojo and her mom would go out to the barn to check on the bats hanging from the rafters. It seemed that they were using the barn as a maternity roost. Jojo’s mom would sweep up the bats droppings once a week and put them on her garden, but over the years things changed drastically and there wasn’t enough to sweep up.

Fact: Bats overwinter in caves and mine shafts, and there is a disease called white-nose syndrome that is killing them off. Bats come out at night to feed on insects, so bat scientists ask people to report to them when and where they see bats and how many. In Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story it became a family ritual for Jojo’s family. They were sad that each year there were fewer bats in their barn so fewer to count at sundown.

One day Jojo and her mom discover only one bat hanging from a rafter. They wait and hope that the bat will safely have a baby and so begin the increase of their population. What they find as the family lies on the grass one night, waiting and hoping to count the bat and her baby when they fly out to feed, is for you to find out as you read this wonderful book. 

Personally, I like little brown bats. Unfortunately, their population here in Nova Scotia has been greatly affected by white-nose syndrome. It’s disappointing to not hear them clicking and see them silently flying around at night catching mosquitoes and other pesky insects. Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story by Anna Forrester is an excellent way to introduce young readers to nature’s crisis of the plight of bats.

In the back of the book is a section For Creative Minds with Bat Facts, Bat Bodies information, White-Nose Syndrome facts and how to help bats, and Citizen Science for readers who want to help with bat counts.

You can find Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story by Anna Forrester on my BUY THE BOOK page. I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Goodreads, and on Chapters.Indigo if available there.

Your comments here for authors and illustrators are very much appreciated.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂