Tag Archives: reading

13 of the most terrifying books published

Hey there, word lovers!

Since Hallowe’en is fast approaching, I thought this might be of interest to you. I found this list that was compiled by a library. They call it 13 Most Terrifying Books of All Time.

  1. Pet Sematary – by Stephen King
  2. The Island of Dr. Moreau – by H.G. Wells
  3. The Cask of Amontillado – by Edgar Allen Poe
  4. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde – by Robert Louis Stevenson
  5. The Turn of the Screw – by Henry James
  6. Frankenstein – by Mary Shelley
  7. The Exorcist – by William Peter Blatty
  8. Something Wicked This Way Comes – by Ray Bradbury
  9. Silence of the Lambs – by Thomas Harris
  10. Hell House – by Richard Matheson
  11. Rosemary’s Baby – by Ira Levin
  12. Dracula – by Bram Stoker
  13. House of Leaves – by Mark Z. Danielewski

I will not read: #1 – Pet Sematary; #7 – The Exorcist (saw the movie years ago and that was enough!); #11 – Rosemary’s Baby.

I have read: #2 – Island of Dr. Moreau; #5 – The Turn of the Screw; #12 – Dracula (only in the daytime) – and they weren’t all that scary to me then. Well, except Dracula – which I enjoyed – although it kind of spooked me.

I plan to read: #6 – Frankenstein; #4 – The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Since I sometimes can be easily spooked, being a very visual reader (and I don’t like being haunted by the visuals), the others I’m not sure about: #3 – The Cask of Amontillado; #8 – Something Wicked This Way Comes; #9 – Silence of the Lambs; #10 – Hell House; #13 – House of Leaves.

What do you advise? Which ones have you read, and what did you think of them? Which ones would you suggest I avoid?

Stay safe and well. Thanks for reading … and Happy Musings!

4 new brief book reviews: The Tale of Despereaux – Kate DiCamillo; Someone To Watch Over Me – Jill Churchill; The Pursuit of Happyness – Chris Gardner; White Fragility – Robin DiAngelo

Reading is my go-to thing, more than ever. Although I’m painting on Thursdays again I’m keeping up my close relationship with books. Here I’m continuing to tell you about the books I’ve read for the reading challenges. Perhaps you have read some of them.

Title: The Tale of Despereaux

Author: Kate DiCamillo

Published: September 9, 2008

This is the four-part sweet story of a teeny, tiny mouse – Despereaux – who fell in love with a human princess. Because of that, and not repenting of it, he was condemned to the castle dungeon where rats lived and mice died. Despereaux proved to be clever and brave, not only for himself but for the princess who was in danger. Enjoyable black and white illustrations.
In the 52books challenge, I used it for prompt “author with a 9-letter last name,” but it could also fit four other prompts.

Title: Someone To Watch Over Me

Author: Jill Churchill

Published: September 3, 2002

I read this book for an extra challenge prompt (author or character with a floral name) for 52booksclub, and found it to be quite enjoyable. A brother and sister – Robert and Lily Brewster – who were once wealthy, now lived in their uncle’s mansion after the Crash of 1929. Robert finds a man’s mummified body in the old icehouse, and soon after that another man’s body was found in the woods. New to the community, the Brewsters tried to help the police chief solve the mysteries.


Title: The Pursuit of Happyness

Author: Chris Gardner

Published: October 24, 2006

Having seen the movie starring Will Smith, I was pleased to have found the book. I used it for the 52BooksClub reading challenge, prompt #31 – Book that shares a similar title to another book. (The Pursuit of Happiness by Douglas Kennedy)
Chris Gardner lived through an unenviable childhood of poverty and abuse, shuttled from one family to another. His mother was the person he most loved, but who was not always able to be there for or with him. It was she who planted in him the desire to succeed in life, and the belief that he could succeed in a big way. This is his story of how that transpired, and it is told in an open, honest, raw way, foul language and questionable behaviour included. It is a true rags-to-riches story, and the promise of a boy-to-man to always be there for his future children.


Title: White Fragility: Why it’s so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

Author: Robin DiAngelo

Published: June 26, 2018

This is a difficult book for me to review as it is told from the viewpoint of someone who teaches others how to define and expose racism that seems to be in everyone, and how to recognize it. She then explains ways to deal with it in oneself and when noticing it in others. It is rather like a textbook in content and presentation, but still is interesting, educational, and helpful.

I chose this book for the Indigo reading challenge for prompt “A book to build your antiracist reading list.”

So… have you? Read any of these, I mean? Or maybe they are on your TBR list? What are your thoughts?

Thanks for stopping in, and … Happy Reading! 🙂

4 Brief Book Reviews: Reagandoodle and Little Buddy – Sandi Swiridoff; Angela’s Ashes – Frank McCourt; The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek – Kim Michele Richardson; My Sister the Moon – Sue Harrison

Wow! This past week went quickly and I realized I hadn’t posted another set of reviews for you. So, here it is.

Title: Reagandoodle and Little Buddy: The True Story of a Labradoodle and His Toddler Best Friend

Author: Sandi Swiridoff

Published: October 2, 2018

I chose this book for the 52Bookclub challenge, prompt “featuring adoption.”

This is such a fun story, a serious story but told from the voice of the dog which makes it quite enjoyable. The main focus of this true story is fostering and adoption – fostering Little Buddy and other children, and including the adoption of Reagandoodle, a labradoodle. It is gorgeously illustrated with photography of the boy and dog together in many situations, in matching outfits. Fun, sweet, a forever friendship.
“A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this book will be donated to help support children in foster care.”

Title: Angela’s Ashes

Author: Frank McCourt

Published: November 30, 1999

This is a raw, truthful, very revealing memoir set mainly in Ireland. The poverty the author lived through in his childhood was ghastly and painful to read about, and the fact that he survived at all is amazing. He tells of the extremes of poverty and the negligence of his alcoholic father who failed to provide for his family even when he’d manage to land a job for a few weeks. His mother suffered greatly, several of his siblings died, he himself almost succumbed to typhoid. Even with all this, the story is such a good read by a man who was brave enough to share it.

I used this book for The 52Bookclub challenge for two prompts – “Related to the word “fire””, and for the club’s March mini-challenge prompt “Set in Ireland.”

Title: The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek

Author: Kim Michele Richardson

Published: May 7, 2019

This is such a good book written from facts – as in book women and blue-skinned families of Kentucky. In this fictional account, a young woman and her father, both of the generational line of blue people, live in poverty as did many families in the hills of Kentucky. We read how blue people were feared and treated with prejudice, but were kind and gentle themselves. The blue lady is a book woman who rides her feisty mule to remote homes, schools, and small communities to deliver library books for loan. Her work is difficult and dangerous, but she loves it, although her life and safety are threatened. She feels ashamed of her blue skin and expects to never have a home and family of her own. Sad, bad, and surprising things happen, all making this a fabulous story. There is an author’s note at the end which provides further information of interest.

I chose this book for The 52BookClub challenge for the May mini-challenge, prompt “a book published in spring – any year.”

Title: My Sister The Moon

Author: Sue Harrison

Published: February 13, 1992

This is the second book in the Ivory Carver series, a saga based in prehistoric Alaska. In this story the second generation is featured, the children of the main characters in the first book, and focuses mainly on Kiin (pronounced keen) who is an unwanted daughter. She is strong in spirit, brave in character, and sharp in mind – and has to be in order to survive the abuse and hatred of her father and brother. It is not her fault that she, and not her brother, was the firstborn, but beliefs and superstitions make her life extremely hard.
This is a difficult story to read at times, but it is so well researched and written that it is a totally believable historical fiction. The characters were invented, but the history surrounding them was not.
I am eager to read book three.

I used this book for the 52bookclub challenge, prompt #48 – “a cover with a woman facing away”; and for the Indigo 2021 reading challenge, prompt “a book to help you escape to another world.” (in this case it is the prehistoric world)

Have you read any of the above books yet?

Thanks for reading, and … Blessings on your day! 🙂

Juneteenth (June 19) honours Black Americans. Here is a suitable Reading List.

Admittedly, I don’t venture far into books about race – and I don’t mean that in a bad way (I’m sorry … I don’t know how to phrase things to be sure it’s non-offensive) – but usually I don’t read a book because of who its author is or isn’t. Lately I have become more aware, you might say, and have read a few that, for me, are very educational and well worth reading. The following list of 35 books are some of many that are recommended reads in connection to Juneteenth and on issues of race.

  1. Four Hundred Souls – by Ibram X. Kendri
  2. On Juneteenth – by Annette Gordon-Reed
  3. Barracoon: the story of the last “Black Cargo” – by Zora Neale Hurston
  4. Frederick Douglass: prophet of freedom – by David W. Blight
  5. Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow – by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  6. A Little Devil in America: Notes in Praise of Black Performance – by Hanif Abdurraqir
  7. How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America – by Kiera Laymon
  8. I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness – by Austin Channing Brown
  9. Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All – by Martha S. Jones
  10. A Black Woman’s History of the United States – by Daina Ramey Berry and Kali Nicole Gross
  11. His Truth is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope – by Jon Meacham
  12. Wandering in Strange Lands: a Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots – by Morgan Jerkins
  13. Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and its Urgent Lessons for Our Own – by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
  14. Overground Railroad: the Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel in America – by Candace Taylor
  15. White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism – by Robin DiAngelo
  16. The Souls of Black Folk – by W.E.B. Du Bois
  17. The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America – by Kahlil Gibran Muhammad
  18. The Origins of Others – by Toni Morrison
  19. White Rage: the Unspoken Truth of our Racial Divide – by Carol Anderson
  20. Progressive Dystopia: Abolition, Antiblackness, and Schooling in San Francisco – by Savannah Sange
  21. Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right – by Arli Hochschild
  22. City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles (1771-1965) – by Kelly Lytle Hernandez
  23. Race, Reform, and Rebellion: the Second Reconstruction and Beyond in Black America, 1945-2006 – by Manning Marable
  24. Racism: a Short History – by George M. Frederickson
  25. When Police Kill – by Franklin E. Zimring
  26. Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution and Imprisonment – by Angela Davis
  27. The Hate U Give – by Angie Thomas
  28. How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History Slavery Across America – by Clint Smith
  29. The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together – by Heather McGhee
  30. From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century – by William A. Darity Jr. & A. Kirsten Mullen
  31. Pourin’ Down Rain: A Black Woman Claims Her Place in the Canadian West – by Cheryl Foggo
  32. At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance – A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power – by Danielle L. McGuire
  33. Kindred – by Octavia E. Butler
  34. Hidden Figures:The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race – by Margot Lee Shetterly
  35. Roots: the Saga of an American Family – by Alex Haley

The titles in bold type are the few on this list I have read so far. Which have you read? Do you have any suggestions to add to this list? If so, please mention them in the comments. Thank you!

Thanks for readings, and … Blessings on your day! 🙂

Have you read any of these books?

Hello, Everyone!

I have been thinking about what to share with you regarding books and reading challenges, so here is the list of books I have read so far for the 52bookclub challenge:

  1. The Alice Network – by Kate Quinn
  2. The Great Alone – by Kristen Hannah
  3. Puff, the Magic Dragon – by Peter Yarrow
  4. Pier 21: a history – by Steven Schwinghammer
  5. Catherine, Called Birdy – by Karen Cushman
  6. My Brilliant Friend – by Elena Ferrante
  7. The Answer Is … Reflections on my Life – by Alex Trebek
  8. The Sun Down Motel – by Simone St. James
  9. Good Mothers Don’t – by Laura Best
  10. You Had Me at Hola – by Alexis Daria
  11. A Soldier’s Sketchbook: the illustrated First World War Diary of R.H. Rabjohn – by John Wilson
  12. Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang – by Kate Wilhelm
  13. Uncommon Danger – by Eric Ambler
  14. Krambambuli – by Syr Ruus
  15. St. George and the Dragon – by Beth Andrews
  16. The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit – by Sloan Wilson
  17. Their Eyes Were Watching God – by Zora Neale Hurston
  18. Big Magic: Creative Magic Beyond Fear – by Elizabeth Gilbert
  19. The Calculating Stars – by Mary Robinette Kowal
  20. Before Green Gables – by Budge Wilson
  21. Reagandoodle and Little Buddy: the true story of a labradoodle and his toddler best friend – by Sandi Swiridoff
  22. Angela’s Ashes: a memoir – by Frank McCourt
  23. The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek – by Kim Michele Richardson
  24. My Sister the Moon – by Sue Harrison
  25. The Tale of Despereaux – by Kate DiCamillo
  26. Someone to Watch Over Me – by Jill Churchill
  27. The Pursuit of Happyness – by Chris Gardner

For the Indigo reading challenge I have read:

  1. Catherine, Called Birdy – by Karen Cushman
  2. My Brilliant Friend – by Elena Ferrante
  3. Good Mothers Don’t – by Laura Best
  4. White Fragility: why it’s so hard for white people to talk about racism – by Robin DiAngelo
  5. Krambambuli – by Syr Ruus
  6. Our House is on Fire: scenes of a family and a planet in crisis – by Malena Ernman
  7. The City in the Middle of the Night – by Charlie Jane Anders
  8. My Sister the Moon – by Sue Harrison
  9. Big Burn – by Lesley Choyce

For the Agatha Christie reading challenge — none yet.

For what I’ve read for the Goodreads personal challenge you can check my page there (I’m there as Lynn Davidson); too many books to add here because I am halfway to my goal of 700.

Of the above 31 books, which ones have you read? Do you have any of them in your TBR (to be read) stash?

Thanks for reading … and Blessings on your day!

Brief update & a Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe quote

My dear friends,

You haven’t seen me around in a long time, and when I received an email asking if I’m okay I thought perhaps I should let you know that .. yes, I am okay. I am doing better than when I began a break from here. Thank you for your thoughts, prayers and concern.

Still one of my dad’s caregivers (now 1/3 of the way into our 8th year), and because I was on the verge of a breakdown – mentally, emotionally, and physically – I’ve made some changes that have taken some stress off, thereby helping me feel less burdened and depressed. I’ll share more about that at a later date as I’m not ready to yet. However, I have been busy … reading a lot but not writing, not even blogging, as you know. I haven’t been able to keep up with emails or book reviews, although now I am slowly updating my page “My have read 2018 book list.” I’ve read more books (mainly children’s books) this year than ever, already surpassing my year’s goal of 500.

I just wanted to let you know you’re not forgotten and that I am doing better than I have in a long time.

Before I go, here is a quote I thought might be meaningful or encouraging to you.

WHATEVER YOU CAN DO, OR DREAM YOU CAN, BEGIN IT. BOLDNESS HAS GENIUS, POWER AND MAGIC IN IT.

– Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Does this quote speak to you in some way?

Love and Blessings to all.  Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

 

 

BOOKS quote

Today, to let you know I am still around and to keep in touch, I have a wonderful quote for you.

BOOKS are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

– Charles William Eliot (American educator, 1834-1926)

I can’t argue with that!  Any thoughts?

Thanks for reading, and Creative Musings!  🙂