‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 3: 104-155 of the list of 623 best books ever!

Are you ready for week three of our Read More Books challenge?

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s not too late to join in.

Check WEEK ONE and WEEK TWO of the list.

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

NOTE: Next Thursday, Part 10 of Sue Harrison’s writers workshop will be the highlight. Come back October 31 for part four of the reading challenge. This gives you more time to read until the next list of books. 🙂

Here is week three’s list:

104. The Heart is A Lonely Hunter — by Carson McCullers
105. Vanity Fair — by William Makepeace Thackeray
106. Commedia — by Dante Alighieri
107. The Count of Monte Cristo — by Alexandre Dumas
108. An American Tragedy — by Theodore Dreiser
109. White Noise — by Don DeLillo
110. The World According to Garp — by John Irving
111. Atonement — by Ian McEwan
112. Nostromo — by Joseph Conrad
113. The House of Mirth — by Edith Wharton
114. The Brothers Karamazov — by Fyodor Dostoevsky
115. The Good Soldier — by Ford Madox Ford
116. The Name of the Rose — by Umberto Eco
117. The Shipping News — by Annie Proulx
118. The Woman in White — by Wilkie Collins
119. Herzog — by Saul Bellow
120. The Counterfeiters — by Andre Gide
121. My Antonia — by Willa Cather
122. Scoop — by Evelyn Waugh
123. A Room with a View — by E. M. Forster
124. Bible: King James Version
125. Wide Sargasso Sea — by Jean Rhys
126. Love in The Time of Cholera — by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
127. The Remains of the day — by Kazuo Ishiguro
128. The Big Sleep — by Raymond Chandler
129. I, Claudius — by Robert Graves
130. Tropic of Cancer — by Henry Miller
131. Tender is the Night — by F. Scott Fitzgerald
132. Journey to the End of the Night — by Louis-Ferdinand Celine
133. The War of the Worlds — by H. G. Wells
134. A Suitable Boy — by Vikram Seth
135. Possession — by A. S. Byatt
136. A Confederacy of Dunces — by John Kennedy Toole
137. The Bell Jar — by Sylvia Plath
138. Waiting for Godot — by Samuel Beckett
139. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao — by Junot Diaz
140. Being and Nothingness — by Jean-Paul Sartre
141. A Thousand Acres — by Jane Smiley
142. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay — by Michael Chabon
143. The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956: An Experiment in Literary Investigation — by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
144. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory — by Roald Dahl
145. Lady Chatterley’s Lover — by D. H. Lawrence
146. JR — by William Gaddis
147. The Histories — by Herodotus
148. Doctor Zhivago — by Boris Pasternak
149. Lucky Jim — by Kingsley Amis
150. Underworld — by Don DeLillo
151. If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler — by Italo Calvino
152. Life — by Georges Perec
153. The Master and Margarita — by Mikhail Bulgakov
154. The Good Earth — by Pearl S. Buck
155. Henderson the Rain King — by Saul Bellow
 
From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! 🙂

Advertisements

9 responses to “‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 3: 104-155 of the list of 623 best books ever!

  1. AAAHH!! I have almost failed this one completely, but I read the Bible and started one or two others! Movies only for a few. I finished Wuthering Heights, reread Animal Farm, and Call of the Wild this week and am currently reading Mother Earth, Father Sky by Sue Harrison (not on the list, but perhaps should be some day). Reading time is at a premium these days.

    Like

  2. This week’s list is a hard one for me. The only books I have read on it thus far are the Bible, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. I have seen the movie War of the Worlds and will have to read my Kindle copy to compare with the movie, since – oddly enough – it’s one of my favourites. Doctor Zhivago was one of my mother’s favourite movies, and my husband really likes it, too, but I didn’t – so I don’t know if I could stay with the book.

    As for last week’s list, I am almost finished reading Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Also, I found my copy of Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger (from week one’s list) so will read that soon.

    NOTE: I finished Jane Eyre and started The Catcher in the Rye.

    Like

  3. I’m ALWAYS up for a Don DeLillo book–I didn’t even know about Underworld. I’ll have to check that out. What a list! Thanks, Lynn. (Side note, I could not for the life of me get through Wide Sargasso Sea. I don’t know what my problem is but that book was monstrously boring.)

    Like

    • Hi Kiersi, thanks for your contribution. 🙂

      I have not read any of Don DeLillo’s work. Perhaps that is something I should remedy.
      Strange, isn’t it, while one person loves a book another reader just can’t slog their way through. Maybe at a later time you can pick up wide Sargasso Sea and breeze right through it. It happens. 🙂

      Like

  4. Only 18 on this list but a couple of all time favourites, Doctor Zhivago, My Antonia, Love in The Time of Cholera, Possession, Remains of the Day and A Room with a View. All books I could read many times. There were some titles I hadn’t heard of befoe so may be worth checking out. I’m reading The Book of Negroes right now and it is excellent.

    Like

    • Many on this week’s list I hadn’t heard of before. I am curious about Love in the Time of Cholera, though, and A Room With a View. Hopefully I can read those ones, maybe borrowing from the library.
      Thanks, Darlene, for the suggested book.

      Like

  5. Oh-oh, only 6 in this group, but that does include the King James version Bible, the whole thing, which I read as a teenager, front to back, and Gulag Archipelago, not an easy read. I have quite a few of the others in my to-read stack. Have to get at it!! I love these posts, Lynn!!

    Like

    • I’m glad you’re enjoying them, Sue. I just finished reading Jane Eyre and have to start another title but it will be from a past list. So many books from which to choose!

      Like

I look forward to reading your comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s