Monthly Archives: December 2013

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Minnie's first ChristmasMINNIE AND I

WISH YOU

A VERY

MERRY CHRISTMAS,

AND

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

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My Schnoodle puppy .. update

IMG_0645 IMG_0704IMG_0716 IMG_0724Remember Minnie, my baby Schnoodle? This is her   —> the day I brought her home November 30. December 3 she weighed 2.2 pounds (997.90 grams)   The next three images are of her this past week. She now weighs 2.9 pounds (1 kg 315.42g)

 

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Is she adorable, or what?!

The red sweater is the smallest I could find and it fits her well for now.

Did you notice the little bell on her collar? The first very small collar I bought her she was able to slip right out of so I got another one I could adjust smaller – and it’s loose. It already had a bell on it, which I am glad of because I was afraid I would lose her in my house!

Minnie loves the snow. She is funny when she gets playful in it, rolling around, doing a face plant, and then pushing the snow with her little nose. Right now, since we got freezing rain last night and today, she can trot along on top of the crusty snow and not leave the slightest impression, she is so light. The slippery layer does make it harder for her to climb the snowbanks, though, as she slides backwards to where she started. 🙂

That’s all for now. I will be sharing more about Minnie later.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 10: 468-519 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week ten of our Read More Books challenge? 

 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

 

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

 

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR  WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN   WEEK EIGHT   WEEK NINE

 

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

468. A Room of One’s Own — by Virginia Woolf
469. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy — by John le Carré
470. Berlin Alexanderplatz — by Alfred Döblin
471. Cold Sassy Tree — by Olive Ann Burns
472. Look Homeward, Angel — by Thomas Wolfe
473. The Martian Chronicles — by Ray Bradbury
474. Skinny Legs and All — by Tom Robbins
475. Oliver Twist — by Charles Dickens
476.It — by Stephen King
477.A High Wind in Jamaica — by Richard Hughes
478. Cities of Salt  — by Abdelrahman Munif
479. You Shall Know Our Velocity — by Dave Eggers
480. Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein — by Marguerite Duras
481. The Death of Artemio Cruz — by Carlos Fuentes
482. The Power and the Glory — by Graham Greene
483. War and Remembrance — by Herman Wouk
484. Baudolino — by Umberto Eco
485. Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant — by Anne Tyler
486. The age of wire and string — by Ben Marcus
487. The Sorrows of Young Werther — by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
488. Where the Wild Things Are — by Maurice Sendak
489. Night Watch — by Terry Pratchett
490. Tropismes — by Nathalie Sarraute
491. Tlooth — by Harry Mathews
492. The Godfather — by Mario Puzo
493. Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me — by Richard Fariña
494. Pricksongs & descants — by Robert Coover
495. Waiting for the Mahatma — by R. K. Narayan
496. The Journal of Jules Renard — by Jules Renard
497. Notes from a small island — by Bill Bryson
498. Centennial — by James A. Michener
499. the man in the high castle — by Philip K. Dick
500. The Last Chronicle of Barset — by Anthony Trollope
501. Night — by Elie Wiesel
502. The Pickwick Papers — by Charles Dickens
503. Écrits — by Jacques Lacan
504. Silent Spring — by Rachel Carson
505. Jayber Crow — by Wendell Berry
506. Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont — by Elizabeth Taylor
507. The road from Coorain — by Jill Ker Conway
508. The Theater and Its Double — by Antonin Artaud
509. The Three Musketeers — by Alexandre Dumas
510. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas — by Gertrude Stein
511. Little, Big — by John Crowley
512. Manhattan Transfer — by John Dos Passos
513. A Brief History of Time — by Stephen Hawking
514. Candide — by Voltaire
515. The Sheltering Sky — by Paul Bowles
516. Popol Vuh — by Anonymous
517. Time and Again — by Jack Finney
518. Moravagine — by Blaise Cendrars
519. The Left Hand of Darkness — by Ursula K. Le Guin
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:

 

  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

 

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

 

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 9: 416-467 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week nine of our Read More Books challenge? 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR  WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN   WEEK EIGHT

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

416. Petersburg — by Andrei Bely
417. City of Glass — by Paul Auster
418. Watchmen — by Alan Moore
419. The Satanic Verses — by Salman Rushdie
420. Libra — by Don DeLillo
421. Friday, or, The Other Island — by Michel Tournier
422. The Shadow of the Wind — by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
423. Parade’s End — by Ford Madox Ford
424. The Pursuit of Love — by Nancy Mitford
425. Always Coming Home — by Ursula K. Le Guin
426. The Princesse de Cleves — by Madame de La Fayette
427. Naked Lunch — by William S. Burroughs
428. Black Beauty — by Anna Sewell
429. The Savage Detectives — by Roberto Bolaño
430. London Fields — by Martin Amis
431. Infinite Jest — by David Foster Wallace
432. Artemis Fowl — by Eoin Colfer
433. Les Vrilles de La Vigne — by Colette
434. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time — by Mark Haddon
435. Zuleika Dobson — by Max Beerbohm
436. Testament of Youth — by Vera Brittain
437. Capital of Pain — by Paul Eluard
438. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn — by Betty Smith
439. Half of a Yellow Sun — by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
440. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories — by Flannery O’Connor
441. Martin Eden — by Jack London
442. Red Harvest — by Dashiell Hammett
443. Noughts & Crosses — by Malorie Blackman
444. The Leopard — by Giuseppe Di Lampedusa
445. The Alexandria Quartet — by Lawrence Durrell
446. The Ballad of the Salt Sea — by Hugo Pratt
447. What We Talk About When We Talk About Love — by Raymond Carver
448. Haroun and the Sea of Stories — by Salman Rushdie
449. Writing Degree Zero — by Roland Barthes
450. Cane — by Jean Toomer
451. The Lovely Bones — by Alice Sebold
452. Tales of the City — by Armistead Maupin
453. The Joy Luck Club — by Amy Tan
454. Mort — by Terry Pratchett
455. The Opposing Shore — by Julien Gracq
456. The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences — by Michel Foucault
457. Riddley Walker — by Russell Hoban
458. Of Human Bondage — by W. Somerset Maugham
459. Go in beauty — by William Eastlake
460. A Separate Peace — by John Knowles
461. The Quiet American — by Graham Greene
462. Dracula — by Bram Stoker
463. The Franchiser — by Stanley Elkin
464. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance — by Robert M. Pirsig
465. Enormous Changes at the Last Minute — by Grace Paley
466. Guards! Guards! — by Terry Pratchett
467. Ellen Foster — by Kaye Gibbons
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings! :)

Have you ever seen a Schnoodle?

Are you ready for a story? Have you ever seen a Schnoodle?

As you may recall, last month I began seriously looking for a dog. My beautiful Shasta died tragically four years ago at only nine years of age, and I still miss her terribly. At the end of October our youngest daughter moved from where she was renting to a house where she could take her little Sammy (a Mauxie, which is a Maltese x Dachshund), so that left me without a dog here for the first time in about thirty years! Sammy had lived with us for eight years and I discovered just how much of a “dog person” I really am after he moved out the night of my birthday in mid-November.

After telling my husband “I have to have a dog!” my search began. I made phone calls to the SPCA, Veterinarian clinics, a dog breeder, animal control, asked questions here on my blog and talked to people I met during my day, and I searched the internet. When our daughter in Alberta was home for a visit in August we’d compiled a list of what I wanted in a dog, which narrowed down my search, and complicated it at the same time. What I had described was mostly my Shasta, but I knew I would never find a dog exactly like her, so I researched and cross-referenced and fine-tuned my search to what qualities I was looking for in a dog. I also decided it had to be a small breed this time, one I could take  to my dad’s on my weeks there; Dad had to like it. If only for myself a medium size breed was preferred, but a small breed would have a better chance with Dad.

The SPCA and such places had mostly large dogs, Kijiji had many dogs listed and one does have to be careful when shopping that way for a pet. I was very mindful of that, but kept searching (and … seriously … praying) to find the right one. 

Through my research I decided the breed that would best suit my situation is a hybrid, specifically a Schnoodle. A Schnoodle is a Schnauzer x Poodle, and I liked what I found out about those small breeds. Furthermore, both breeds can be trained to be great as therapy dogs, one of my requirements for Dad’s sake. It had to be a Schnoodle! Now all I had to do was find one I could afford and easily obtain. That wasn’t easy!

The last week of November I located a litter of Schnoodles here in Nova Scotia. The price was more reasonable and it wasn’t as far, so I inquired. One little female was left! I mentioned it to my husband again and showed him the picture. Surprisingly, he told me to go ahead and get myself a dog, he would pay half — “Merry Christmas!” So sweet of him and such a blessing to me; I almost cried!

When I responded to the ad the sellers’ reply was they had one little female left, she was the runt of the litter of four, has a very slight heart murmur, and is small but not fragile as she can certainly hold her own with the other dogs. I expressed strong interest and said I could be there on the weekend to get her. It’s a bit of a long story, but I will simplify it by saying there was a misunderstanding and the next day I found out I had to wait while someone else who called after me had the choice to take her or not. Needless to say, I was upset, but later that evening the seller called with the news that she was still available because the formerly interested party felt she was too small and they were afraid they’d hurt her! I could have her … did I want her? Did I want her?! I was ready for small, I was a definite! Yes, I want her!

Mid-afternoon the next day – November 30 – my husband and I made the two-hour drive to meet the puppy and her parents. Her mother is a Poodle x Schnauzer, her father is a miniature Poodle. Lovely dogs. But when I saw the remaining baby … oh. my. goodness! So tiny and fluffy! When she was put into my hands I said, “I love her already!”

Now I want you to meet Minnie (born September 24)
(Poor little thing didn’t have a definite name until Monday night; I had a hard time deciding.)

Minnie Nov 30'13Minnie. Dec 5'13Minnie Dec 1'13

 

 

 

 

Minnie is tiny; she is spunky; she is adorable. And she is hilarious!  

It took her a couple of days to stop whining, and another couple to feel content enough to not miss her mother and the rest of the pack where she started life. Now she is in a new routine, travelling back and forth with me during my respite hours, and enjoying both her homes. Tonight she did something new … running and tearing around in Dad’s living room, racing circles around me and making my dad laugh as he tried to keep his focus on her while she sped around the room. Then when she tired herself out she slept in his arms. That is what I hoped for; she has fit in quite well.

On Tuesday Minnie met her veterinarian. Dr. Bligh told me her heart murmur is nothing to worry about and that I got myself a great little dog. 🙂  Oh, and she weighs not quite 2.5 pounds! (about a kilogram)

And did I mention … she is almost completely house-trained. AND I get to stand out in the cold while she trots around carrying fallen oak leaves nearly her own size as I’m waiting for her to “do her business”!  BRRR!  Yep! This was a great plan. What a way to get me outside more often.

I thank God for this little dog, and I plan to go through the training necessary to get her to the place I envision for her.  (Anyone who knows me will know that is a big step. 🙂 )

That’s my exciting news! Thank you to everyone who gave suggestions and wished me well in my search. You are wonderful people. 🙂

Do you have anything exciting to share? Any great pet stories?

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

‘Read More Books’ challenge: Week 8: 364-415 of the list of 623 of the best books ever!

Are you ready for week eight of our Read More Books challenge? 

 

Read HERE to learn about it. It’s never too late to join in.

 

Check the ones you may have missed or want to review:

 

WEEK ONE   WEEK TWO   WEEK THREE   WEEK FOUR   WEEK FIVE    WEEK SIX  WEEK SEVEN

 

How did you do with your reading? Even if you didn’t finish the book you selected, it counts if you select one for this week to add to your TBR pile.

364. Father and Sons — by Ivan Turgenev
365. A Wild Sheep Chase — by Haruki Murakami
366. Point Counter Point — by Aldous Huxley
367. Babbitt — by Sinclair Lewis
368. The Souls of Black Folk — by W. E. B. Du Bois
369. The Thirty-Nine Steps — by John Buchan
370. The Jungle — by Upton Sinclair
371. Under Satan’s Sun — by Georges Bernanos
372. The Voyeur — by Alain Robbe-Grillet
373. The Secret Agent — by Joseph Conrad
374. All Quiet on the Western Front — by Erich Maria Remarque
375. Double or Nothing — by Rayond Federman
376.  The Bonfire of the Vanities — by Tom Wolfe
377. The Phantom Tollbooth — by Norton Juster
378. Amers/Oiseaux/Poesie — by Saint-John Perse
379. The House of the Spirits — by Isabel Allende
380. Paradise Lost — by John Milton
381. The Joke — by Milan Kundera
382. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — by L. Frank Baum
383. At Swim-Two-Birds — by Flann O’Brien
384. Contempt — by Alberto Moravia
385. Dealing with Dragons — by Patricia C. Wrede
386. Blood Meridian — by Cormac McCarthy
387. The Home and the World — by Rabindranath Tagore
388. 2001: A Space Odyssey — by Arthur C. Clarke
389. American Pastoral — by Philip Roth
390. The Cannibal — by John Hawkes
391.Matilda — by Roald Dahl
392.The Thornbirds — Colleen McCullough
 393. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd — Agatha Christie
394.Good Night, Mr. Tom — Michelle Magorian
395. Nadja — André Breton
396.King Lear — William Shakespeare
 397. The Magnificent Ambersons — Booth Tarkington
398.Othello — William Shakespeare
399. Aurélien — Louis Aragon 
400.Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World Haruki Murakami
401.The Color of Water — James McBride
402.Soulier De Satin — Paul Claudel
403. Leaves of Grass — Walt Whitman
404. The Sonnets — William Shakespeare
405.American Psycho — Bret Easton Ellis
406. The Bean Trees — Barbara Kingsolver
407. Nightwood —by Djuna Barnes
408. Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction — by J. D. Salinger
409. High Fidelity — Nick Hornby
410. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas — Hunter S. Thompson
411. Kane and Abel — Jeffrey Archer
412. Franny and Zooey — J. D. Salinger
413. The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui —by Bertolt Brecht
414. Sense and Sensibility — Jane Austen
415.The Faraway Tree Stories — Enid Blyton
 
I love to hear from you!  From the above list:
  • Which books have you read?
  • Which books do you want to read?
  • Which books are you going to obtain this week?(Even if you are not officially taking the Read More Books challenge I would love to hear about your reading.)

Note: I got permission to share this list on my blog. (Thank you, Stuart!) You could go HERE for the list of “623 of the best books ever written” and see them all at once for yourself, and/or you can follow the list here a few at a time.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  :)

Writing challenges over for now, fun news

It’s snowing on my blog again!  🙂

A quick note tonight ..

So quickly the month of November is gone and some of us are into Christmas planning mode. With November done so are that month’s writing challenges. My report is: I made the hard decision and dropped out of NaNoWriMo; I blogged 28 out of 30 days for NaBloPoMo; for PiBoIdMo I met and surpassed the 30 ideas in 30 days having accomplished 40 ideas. Yay! Some of those ideas are only titles, some are names for possible characters, others are ideas for stories. One idea in particular I feel quite good about and have a rough draft begun. That will be the one I start working on first.

piboidmo2013-lightbulb-laugh-200x254Especially exciting news for me in another vein is the day all those things finished another challenge began for me.  I found what I was looking for!  I will tell you more about that in a later post, but do you know what a Schnoodle is? (hint hint) Adorable is what! 🙂

This is my caregiving week and ‘the household’ has just retired for the night so I am off here to get some sleep myself.

Talk to you all later!  Blessings.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂