Book Review: Fire Pie Trout – by Melanie Mosher

 

 

 

 

 

Book: Fire Pie Trout
Author: Melanie Mosher
Illustrator: Renné Benoit
Publisher: Fifth House Publishers
Date: May 20, 2014
Genre: picture book; gr 1-2; age 6-7
Pages: 32
Price: $19.95
My rating: an believable true-to-life story

 

Fire Pie Trout by Melanie Mosher is a wonderful maritime story, another book I purchased at the children’s book fair in 2016.

It’s early morning before the fog is all burned off and little Grace and her grandfather are going fishing. Grace packed their favourite lunch for them – pizza, which her grampie calls fire pie.

This is a realistic story that shows Grace trying to keep up with her grandfather’s long strides. The grass is slippery and wet in the fog, and Grace ends up slipping and falling, so she just rolls down the hill and waits for her grampie.

Gramps shows Grace how to fish, then sits on the bank and lowers his own line into the water. Grace doesn’t want to bait her hook with a worm, so she releases the worm into the grass when her grampie isn’t looking. She begins to worry to her grandfather that maybe she is too young to fish. She’s thinking about it’s being dark, that she’s not allowed to watch scary movies or stay home all alone, so … maybe she is too young to fish, too. Then she secretly releases another worm instead of baiting her hook with it.

In the meantime her grampie has caught two big trout while encouraging her to keep trying. The fog is gone, the sun has warmed them up, and then – after setting free a third worm – Grace has an idea! It involves pizza and Grace realizes she is NOT too young to fish after all.

This is a nicely told true-to-life story with an amusing ending that young readers will enjoy. Some will see themselves in Grace who is a bit nervous, but then discovers how clever she can be.

Fire Pie Trout by Melanie Mosher is a lovely story of a special outing for a grandchild with a loved grandparent. It has beautiful illustrations by Renné Benoit who very effectively captured the look of fog over the water, and the joys of fishing in it.

You can find Fire Pie Trout by Melanie Mosher on my BUY THE BOOK page.

I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Chapters.Indigo, and Goodreads.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

 

 

 

 

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Kindness; and the ballet

I like these words by Ralph Waldo Emerson …

You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late. 

This is my brief post for the weekend, put up late because I forgot to schedule one. I took my girls to dinner and then to the ballet on Saturday – Swan Lake – our first ballet. We left my dad’s at 5:00 PM and didn’t get back until 11:20, so it was a full six hours. (I had a helper stay late that day with Dad.)

We had a very enjoyable time. Lots of laughs, a new experience, and a wonderful needed change for me. 

Have you ever gone to the ballet? Do tell!

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!

Book Review: When a DRAGON Moves in AGAIN – by Jodi Moore

 

 

 

 


Book: When a DRAGON Moves in AGAIN
Author: Jodi Moore
Illustrator: Howard McWilliam
Publisher: Flashlight Press
Date: September 1, 2015
Genre: children's picture book; K-2; age 5-7
Pages: 32
Price: $17.95
My rating: a delightfully fun story of a boy, his dragon, 
and somebody new 

 

Because I haven’t yet had opportunity to read When a Dragon Moves In by Jodi Moore, I am starting with her second book, When a DRAGON Moves in AGAIN. It is completely enjoyable without having to read the first book.

Let’s begin with the end pages which used to be simply plain, but that has changed for many books. These are gorgeous, so family focused. Take a peek.

Isn’t that delightful? Family photos are posted on a  bulletin board, including ones capturing the mischievous little boy making faces at the camera. The end pages at the back are different photos.

 

 

 

 

 

As we begin reading When a DRAGON Moves in AGAIN, and having not read the first book, we naturally assume the little boy has already fully developed his imaginary dragon friend. In this story, the boy and his dragon enter a new situation together.

One day the dad builds what his young son believes to be a castle. Of course, if you have a castle you have a place for your dragon. They bounce and play in it until  … the mom says that’s for the baby. Baby? His sister is hoping for a girl, she obviously feels she has enough brothers. 

For a young child, welcoming a new baby into the family is not always an easy transition. When the baby arrives, his big brother is okay with it until Baby cries a lot. He has to be entertained, but Dragon breaks things and makes a mess in the attempt. When Baby is sleeping Dragon wakes him up. It’s then that Dad decides they’ve had enough of dragons, but Big Brother wants Baby sent back. Dragon is not so sure about that.

The illustrations in When a DRAGON Moves in AGAIN are fabulous. Howard McWilliam has captured the emotions and expressions so accurately, with a humorous touch, it’s easy to feel what everyone in the story feels. This is a wonderful story for the whole family.

You can find When a DRAGON moves in AGAIN by Jodi Moore on my BUY THE BOOK page.

I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Chapters.Indigo, and Goodreads.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Book Review: The Power of Harmony, a novel – by Jan Coates

 

 

 

 






Book: The Power of Harmony
Author: Jan L. Coates
Publisher: Red Deer Press
Date: May 13, 2013
Genre: MG; gr 4-6; age 9-11
Pages: 260
Price: $12.95
My rating: An enjoyable and relatable read for young people. 

This is a novel I purchased from its author at the children’s book fair I attended in 2016.

The Power of Harmony by Jan L. Coates is a fictional story based in the late 1960’s in Nova Scotia, Canada. This novel was an Atlantic Book Awards finalist, and for good reason, I might add. In Spring of 2017 the Nova Scotia Board of Education purchased copies for every school in the province!

The main character, Jennifer, loves to sing, but she is very afraid to sing in public. She prepares for a competition anyway, with not-so-good results, and has to deal with being ridiculed later. With her best friend having moved away, shy Jenn is now faced with being bullied by some mean girls at her school with no close friend there for her.

Recently a First Nations girl, Melody, moved into the neighbourhood. The other kids pick on her, too, because of who she is without even knowing her. Jennifer discovers Melody likes music and books, same as she does, and they become friends. There are also some strange things going on, and Melody seems to have a secret. 

This is such a meaningful story of friendship, bullying, adolescent struggles and fears, acceptance, and even grief through the death of a loved one. It’s a very realistic and moving story, and a pleasure to read.

You can find my reviews of other books by Jan here and here and here.

You can find The Power of Harmony by Jan L. Coates on my BUY THE BOOK page. I also will post it on Amazon.ca, Amazon.com, Chapters.Indigo, and Goodreads.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Book! Books! Books! and a few more

The verdict is in. It’s true. I (might) have a problem. 

There was a fundraiser used books sale in town on March 31 and April 1. On March 31 my daughter and I, with several other book-lovin’ people, got there before the doors opened at 8:40 AM. It was a tight squeeze moving around in that hall, but oh boy! was it fun!  🙂

This is the load of books I came home with that day.

Next photos are the close-ups of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As shown in the above photo, I found a whole lot of Ken Follett books I didn’t have: The Man From St. Petersburg; A Dangerous Fortune; Jackdaws; Night Over Water; The Modigliani Scandal; Whiteout; Winter of the World; Hornet Flight; On Wings of Eagles; Eye of the Needle; Code to Zero. Now I want to find A Column of Fire to complete one of the series I have.

This assortment will be wonderful reading. I’m especially interested in Robin Hobb fantasy books right now. I read Assassin’s Apprentice, book 1 of her Farseer trilogy, & very much want to find preread copies of 2 & 3, Royal Assassin and Assassin’s Quest.

Shown in the above photo: Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold; Queen of Babble by Meg Cabot; The Boy Next Door by Meg Cabot; Vets Might Fly by James Herriot; If Only They Could Talk by James Herriot; Drop Shot by Harlan Coben; and volumes 1, 2, 3 – Dragon Keeper, Dragon Haven, City of Dragons – of the four books of The Rain Wilds Chronicles by Robin Hobb. Of course, I want to find a copy of volume 4, Blood of Dragons.

I was excited to find some Thornton W. Burgess books. When I was a child I had The Adventures of Paddy the Beaver and I don’t know how many times I read that book. I don’t know who my mum gave it to and I never had any others of the series. I’d love to have all of them.

Above: Lighthouse: a Story of Remembrance by Robert Munsch; The Tales of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo; Stellaluna by Jennell Cannon; The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein; and The Adventures of: Reddy Fox, Old Man Coyote, Paddy the Beaver, Old Mr. Toad, Johnny Chuck – all by Thornton W. Burgess.

As I said, my daughter and I went to the sale, so she loaded one bag for me and I loaded a second one. When I got home I discovered I’d somehow missed when paying for them that I had two copies of one title, so today I HAD to go back to exchange one for another book. Right? You understand. It only makes sense. It was no problem for the ladies in charge of the sale so I proceeded to try to find a replacement. Here is what I came home with – only one of which is in exchange:

 

I picked out a mix of genres again. My reading taste varies a lot, as you can see. There’s so much to learn about writing, and what better way than to read?

 

In above photo: Alexander, Who’s Not (Do you hear me? I mean it!) Going to Move – by Judith Viorst; Mirette on the High Wire by Emily Arnold McCully; Louis Braille: The Boy Who Invented Books for the Blind by Margaret Davidson; Going Solo by Roald Dhal; The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl; Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl; The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne; Heroes of the Holocaust by Allan Zullo & Mara Bovsun;  The Kite by W. O. Mitchell; Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston; Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert; ‘Tis: a memoir by Frank McCourt; The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd; Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss; Every Living Thing by James Herriot; The Wedding by Nicholas Sparks; Lost Soldiers by James Webb;  The Cat Who Came in From the Cold by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson; and 5 complete novels of murder and detection (in one volume) – Ten Little Indians; Peril at End House; The Murder at Hazelmoor; Easy to Kill; Evil Under the Sun – by Agatha Christie.

My grandson’s class at school is reading The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. I heard about the movie, that it’s sad, but if my young man can read the book I will, too.

I’m still borrowing books from the library although the Reading for Research  challenge officially ended March 31. I’m in the groove now, you know, so I’ll keep it going. After my book sale shopping I went to the library to pick up books on hold for me and added them to the ones I already have at home. I have some at Dad’s, too. Here is my borrowed pile at home:

 

I have so much reading to do!

When I finish a book I write a short review on Goodreads, so it’s keeping me pretty busy.

 

 

 

Friday evening my husband and I went to a performance by a Newfoundland musical and comedy team called Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers. Very funny and talented. After the show we checked out their items for sale and lo! and behold! Guess what I came home with? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These books were written by two members of the group. I’ll review them here at a later date.

I think that’s all I have to share with you for now. If you need me I’ll be the one reading, with Zamfir or some other equally lovely instrumental background music or nature sounds (birds, the ocean) playing … unless I’m in the mood for total silence. 🙂

Oh, and the problem I mentioned at the beginning? It’s twofold. (1) I seem to be running out of hiding places shelves for my books and (2) I don’t have enough reading time. You thought it was that I keep buying them, didn’t you? Nawww. That’s impossible. 🙂

I recently read a meme that goes: If loving books is a crime … I’m looking at life without parole.  I think it suits me. 🙂

When you read do you need it to be QUIET, or do you fall so completely into the story you hear nothing else anyway?

Love to you all. Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Book Review: Snappsy the Alligator (did not ask to be in this book) – by Julie Falatko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book: Snappsy the Alligator (did not ask to be in this book)
Author: Julie Falatko
Illustrator: Tim Miller
Publisher: Viking Books for Young Readers
Date: February 2, 2016
Genre: children's picture book; pre-school-3; age 3-8
Pages: 40
Price: $16.99
My rating:  An unusual and amusing story

 

Snappsy the Alligator – Did Not Ask to Be in This Book! is the first picture book written by Julie Falatko.

Snappsy is going along minding his own business, just living his ho-hum life. When he realizes he’s suddenly in a book being narrated about him he objects, to no avail.

Snappsy the Alligator Does Not Want to Be in This Book! – and he really does not want to be in this book! – is presented in a way quite different from the usual method of writing a picture book. Julie Falatko has included a narrator to whom her main character is talking.

If you pay attention to Tim Miller’s funny illustrations in relation to the words you will see that what the narrator is saying is, at first, describing everything Snappsy is doing. Snappsy finds that irritating. The reader can figure out what he’s doing without being told step-by-step, but then the narrator starts saying things that make Snappsy sound mean and adventurous. He also calls Snappsy out on his habits, challenging him to try something different. It’s amusing. And it’s effective because Snappsy does something different to make the narration more interesting. 

This is a funny story children will enjoy once they catch on to what’s happening.

You can find Snappsy the Alligator Does Not Want to Be in This Book! by Julie Falatko on my BUY THE BOOK page.

I also post my reviews on Amazon.com, Amazon.ca, Goodreads, and sometimes Chapters.Indigo.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

 

Book Review: A Gift of Music: Emile Benoit & his Fiddle

 

 

 

 






Book: A Gift of Music: Émile Benoit & his Fiddle
Author: Alice Walsh
Illustrator: Geoff Butler
Publisher: Tuckamore Books
Date: May 1, 2010
Genre: non-fiction children's picture book; gr K-5; age 5-9
Pages: 32; paperback
Price: $12.95
My rating: an interesting story about a gifted musician

 

This is another picture book I purchased from one of the authors at the children’s book fair last year.

A Gift of Music: Émile Benoit & his Fiddle is a non-fiction story by Canadian author Alice Walsh about a young boy who grew up to be a well-known fiddler in Canada, the United States, and other countries.

Émile Benoit (March 24, 1913 – September 3, 1992) was born in Newfoundland and weighed only one pound, seven ounces at birth. Émile’s father sheared one of their sheep and his mother wrapped their tiny baby in the raw wool, placed him in a small box under the wood stove to try to save him, and fed him from a dropper. No one thought he would survive, but his mother’s loving care brought him through.

Émile loved music. He especially loved violin, and would practice on the small toy one his father made him that had thread for strings. (Notice the cover illustration above.) His father promised to make him a real violin when he was old enough to have one. When he was twelve, one day he came home from school and there it was! Émile had imagined this so often that he picked up the violin and – within minutes – began to play the tunes he had composed in his head! Friends and family came from all around to hear him play, amazed at his gift of music. In his lifetime he composed more than one hundred tunes.

Alice Walsh has written an interesting story of how, from an early age, Émile Benoit’s life was centered on music. The realistic illustrations by Geoff Butler capture the life and passion of Émile and people in his life. A Gift of Music: Émile Benoit & his Fiddle is an encouraging story for children – who have dreams of their own – to not give up on their talent and important life goals.

At the back of the book there is a page called Historical Note on which is information about Émile. There is also a music score of a tune called Émile’s Dream that he composed in his sleep!

You can find A Gift of Music: Émile Benoit & his Fiddle by Alice Walsh on my BUY THE BOOK page.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂