Tag Archives: chapter book

Book Review: The Rescuing Day – by Christine Goodnough

The Rescuing Day















Book: The Rescuing Day
Author: Christine Goodnough
Illustrator: Wendy Siemens
Publisher: PrairieView Press
Date: 2015
Genre: children's; Christian; grades 1-3
Pages: 48; paperback
Price: $7.75
My rating: an easy pleasant read for children

The Rescuing Day is a chapter book by Canadian author Christine Goodnough, sketched illustrations by Canadian illustrator Wendy Siemens.

First of all, look at the pretty red cover! Between the red covers are short chapters just right for a young reader.

It’s summertime. The story starts with Mom suggesting to her two young daughters that they get their room cleaned up quickly, their Saturday rule, so that they can be in the strawberry patch early – before it gets too hot in the sun. Megan has trouble being neat like her older sister so in her hurry she shoves everything out of sight. When she gets back she can’t find her favourite doll. This is a major crisis for a little girl, and the author depicts her feelings well.

In each chapter is an adventure for some members of the family. They have a mischievous little puppy, a younger brother who gets into his own trouble, and somebody is in need of rescuing in one way or another. There is an incident where the children are in need and they think to pray about it. It’s nicely done by Christine Goodnough, in a natural, non-preachy way.

Table of Contents:

Chapters:

  1. Trip to the Strawberry Patch
  2. Damien’s Equipment Gets New Paint
  3. Callista is Lost
  4. Callista to the Rescue
  5. The Naughty Student
  6. Megan Rescues Shaggy
  7. The Wasps’ Nest
  8. Shaggy to the Rescue

You can find The Rescuing Day on my BUY THE BOOK page. 

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The Stowaways – by Meghan Marentette

the-stowaways










Book: The Stowaways
Author: Meghan Marentette
Illustrator: Dean Griffiths
Publisher: Pajama Press
Date: Oct. 15, 2013
Genre: Children's chapter book; ages 8-12
Pages: 236
Price: $19.95
My rating: an adventure one does not want to leave 
until the end

Last year I had the privilege of meeting several authors at a local  children’s book fair, Meghan Marentette being one of them. Her table was directly beside Carolyn Mallory‘s whose book I reviewed HERE.

Here is a photo I took of them holding their books.

meghan-marentette-carolyn-mallory

The Stowaways is an exciting first novel by Meghan Marentette. The main character, a little mouse by the name of Rory Stowaway, has been compared to Stuart Little, and he does have that gutsy and daring personality.

Rory lives with his twin brother, his little sister, his parents, and his grandmother. Since Rory’s grandfather failed to return from a daring adventure to the World Beyond, his father won’t let anyone go very far. He is anxious and has put a stop to exploring, but Rory is restless and wants to go searching for his grandfather and bring him home. His father is firmly against such an idea and will not hear of it. 

The neighbours all believe Rory’s grandfather was killed in a trap, so they are standoffish with the family. They all are Weedle mice, and Weedle mice are normally not adventurous – the Stowaways being the exception for generations. Rory’s brother, Morgan, is a dreamer and wants to go on a sailing adventure, but when Rory learns his grandmother’s secret he is all the more determined to go on what he plans to be a rescue mission. 

Life for the Stowaway family gets turned upside down by a series of unexpected events, scary and dangerous situations including a hurricane, a girl who likes to catch and cage mice, a cranky cat who wants to do worse than that, and more adventure than even Rory imagined. 

The Stowaways by Meghan Marentette is a fast-paced tale consisting of eighteen chapters, lots of page-turning action, and Dean Griffiths’ wonderful illustrations that include maps on the end pages. It is not only young readers who will enjoy this book.

You can find The Stowaways on my BUY THE BOOK page.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

Book Review: Spaghetti is NOT a Finger Food (and other life lessons) – by Jodi Carmichael

Spaghetti is NOT a Finger FoodBook: Spaghetti is NOT a Finger Food (and other life lessons)
Author: Jodi Carmichael
Illustrator: Sarah Ackerley
Publisher: Little Pickle Press
Date: November 26, 2012 – Kindle; April 1, 2013 – paperback
Genre: chapter book
Pages: 152
Price: Kindle under $5.00; paperback under $7.00
My rating: Excellent way to learn about Asperger’s Syndrome from the child’s point-of-view
 
 

The title – Spaghetti is NOT a Finger Food (and other life lessons) – is the first thing that grabbed my attention, and then the happy innocence of the little boy on the front cover. 

For anyone not familiar with Asperger’s Syndrome, this book is such a great way to learn more about how it affects a child. The whole story is told through the voice of an eight-year-old boy who has Asperger’s Syndrome.

Connor is happy, smart, eager, energetic, and gets into trouble easily because of how differently he relates to his surroundings. He doesn’t mean to, it just seems to happen. And it happens in innocent funny ways. The way Connor tells it is both amusing and informative. For example: after one incident at school, when he was sent – yet again – to the principal’s office, he dashed immediately to his favourite blue chair. It was smooth and calming for him. Obviously he had been there enough times before to have tried all the chairs, but it was not said that way, the reader understood it from the way Jodi Carmichael had Connor tell his experience.

Here are the chapter titles:

  1. Mrs. Winters Does Not Like to Be Interrupted
  2. Girls Are Confusing
  3. Mr. O’Brien Does Not Believe Rules Are to Be Broken – Ever
  4. Smooth Things Are Calming
  5. Lunch Time Can Be Tricky
  6. A Library Voice Is Even Quieter Than an Inside Voice
  7. Stools Are for Standing on and Chairs Are for Sitting On
  8. Even Numbers Rule!
  9. Mrs. Rosetti Has the Best Smiley Face
  10. Feelings Are Confusing
  11. Not All People Are Dog People
  12. A Code Yellow Is Serious Business
  13. Stomach Swirls Can Be Both Good and Bad at the Same Time
  14. Kids Love Dog Tricks

Spaghetti is NOT a Finger Food (and other life lessons) by Jodi Carmichael is a very well-written book that educates while it entertains, while the illustrations by Sarah Ackerley add a wonderful dimension. Having the opportunity to see the world from Connor’s perspective is enlightening. Both children and adults can enjoy this chapter book and learn from it.

You can find Spaghetti is NOT a Finger Food (and other life lessons) listed on my BUY THE BOOK! page.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂

 

 

Book Review: The Adventures of Tomato and Pea, Book 1: A Bad Idea – by Erik Weibel

Tomato and Pea
 Book: The Adventures of Tomato and Pea, Book 1: A Bad Idea
Author: Erik Weibel
Publisher: Erik Weibel
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Date: August 14, 2013
Genre: MG chapter book, adventure
Pages: 72 pages
Price: $5.99 paper; $2.95 Kindle
My rating: Excellent little book for young readers; a fun, convincing adventure
 

I had the privilege to read this book in its unpolished state and later received a copy of the finished product for review.

Having met the author, Erik Weibel, a couple of years ago through his blog “This Kid Reviews Books“, I have been able to watch from afar his growth as a writer. Oh, did I say … Erik self-published his book when he was eleven – he is a twelve-year-old now. And I’m a little jealous.

The Adventures of Tomato and Pea is a fun, entertaining space adventure. Erik has a good handle on writing characters, dialogue, and word pictures. He adds in humour, characters with defined personality, and tension for a good storyline. Erik has paid close attention to enough detail to make this an interesting story to read and visualize.

The reader is presented with friends, enemies, a big problem – such as a spaceship crashing on the planet Ear-th – and further situations that challenge the tiny (only a few inches tall) space travellers. They learn friendship, cooperation, loyalty, integrity, which all are great lessons for children – and adults – and are delivered in a non-preachy way.

Erik Weibel has learned a lot from the tips and lessons he’s been able to receive via writing challenges and exposure. It is evident in this great little book, The Adventures of Tomato and Pea, that his writing skill is beyond his age.

This book is for younguns’ …  boys might enjoy it more but I’m not a boy and I enjoyed it, too! If it is read to a child who can follow along and understand the story it is easily suitable for as young as five – and upward. (My eight-year-old grandson has his own copy and is enjoying reading it.)

Although children should especially enjoy this one, The Adventures of Tomato and Pea written by Erik Weibel is a wonderful read for anyone – and encouragement for future young writers.

You can find The Adventures of Tomato and Pea on my BUY THE BOOK! page.

Come back for my interview with Erik Weibel on March 6, and a book giveaway! Erik is generously offering a copy of his first book to one person who comments.

Thanks for reading, and … Creative Musings!  🙂